Alyssa Rosenberg

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Last quote by Alyssa Rosenberg

I’m reviewing “Game of Thrones” from the perspective of someone who has read all of George R.R. Martin’s novels, while my colleague David Malitz, who hasn’t read the books, will be writing straight recaps. His write-up of episode 5, “Eastwatch, ” will appear at The Post’s Style Blog. This post discusses the events of the Aug. 13 episode of “Game of Thrones” in detail. You can find my recaps of every prior episode of the show here. Readers have reported some problems with the links from ThinkProgress. We’ll be doing our best to get those fixed this week. Can’t get enough “Game of Thrones”? Come on over to my Washington Post chat here Monday at 12 p.m. Mark in your calendars that the chat will be an hour earlier than usual.feedback
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Aug 13 2017
Alyssa Rosenberg has most recently been quoted in an article called The last thing America needs is more of ‘The West Wing’. Alyssa Rosenberg said, “Since election night, liberals have been seeking solace, whether through confessional essays, renewed civic participation, alternate-timeline fan fiction or yoga. I understand those impulses; I’ve even indulged in that last one myself. But in the midst of this orgy of self-care meant to help us survive President Trump’s administration, I’m begging all of us, as well as the entire entertainment industry, not to take us down one particular road. Whatever else happens, please don’t revive “The West Wing.””. Alyssa Rosenberg has been quoted a grand total of 32 times in 32 articles.
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Alyssa Rosenberg quotes

Apr 04 2017 - Immigration

When the Museum of Modern Art decided in February to make a curatorial response to President Trump’s attempts to restrict immigration from some majority-Muslim nations into the United States, it did what seems like the most subversive thing possible in these heated times. The directors decided not to turn the whole world, or at least the fraction of it enclosed in their galleries, upside down. Instead, they put a series of works by artists who hailed from some of the nations targeted in Trump’s executive orders on display in an act that upset the museum’s traditional use of chronology and left a trail of artistic and political bread crumbs for interested visitors to follow. When I meandered through the museum this weekend, I found it to be one of the smartest artistic responses to the Trump administration I’ve seen so far.feedback

Apr 04 2017

This post discusses the major plot reveal in “Ghost in the Shell, ” and for reasons that I should hope are extremely obvious, the plot of “Get Out.”.feedback

Apr 03 2017

This post discusses the plot of “Big Little Lies.”.feedback

Mar 31 2017

Comparing the Republicans in this White House to the Democrats who preceded them.feedback

Mar 31 2017

This piece discusses the plot of the 2017 remake of “Ghost in the Shell.”.feedback

Mar 29 2017 - American politics

All the way back in August 2015, when it still seemed utterly bizarre not simply that Donald Trump had entered the Republican field of candidates for the presidency but also was leading it, my colleague Sonny Bunch wrote a post suggesting that pop culture had, unwittingly, laid the groundwork for Trump’s run. Movies like “Primary Colors, ” “The American President” and “Bulworth” had made a fetish out of politicians who broke with tradition and gave the American people the straight talk they deserved. Hollywood promised us liberal fact-slingers. But Trump showed up instead, peddling a medley of statements that ranged from untrue to ugly and degrading to the American democratic system, and suggesting he was the only one who dared to speak difficult truths suppressed by political correctness. Trump fulfilled Hollywood’s predictions, but in a form plenty of Americans didn’t recognize until it was too late.feedback

Mar 29 2017

This post discusses the plot of “Legion” in relatively vague detail.feedback

Mar 27 2017

This post discusses the plot of the fourth episode of “Feud, ” “More, Or Less.”.feedback

Mar 23 2017

Hollywood hasn’t always shown much interest in telling stories about Latino and Hispanic characters and communities. But Hispanic moviegoers are still some of the most loyal in the nation, according to the Motion Picture Association of America’s annual Theatrical Market Statistics Report, released on Wednesday.feedback

Mar 22 2017 - Twitter

Chelsea Clinton came in for a roasting on Wednesday when some readers mistook the news that she was receiving an award from the Lifetime network and the Hollywood trade magazine Variety to mean she was was going to be the recipient of a lifetime achievement honor. For all this round of particular ire directed at the former first daughter was due to bad faith and misleading headlines, it crystallized an uneasy conviction. If Clinton decides that she wants to run for office or assume some sort of role in American public life - and she has not yet declared that she does, though a more tart Twitter feed and some new projects suggest that she’s attempting to rebrand herself - the best possible thing for her to do in the near-term is to disappear.feedback

Mar 22 2017

The entertainment industry gives the go-ahead to a lot of frustrating projects, but rarely has my head descended to my desk as rapidly as when I learned that in addition to the two Barack Obama biopics that were released before he left office, we’re now going to get a workplace comedy set in the Obama White House. It’s not merely that the rush to make Obama, or even Obama-adjacent, projects reinforces the perception that the entertainment industry is in thrall to the 44th president. Instead, it’s that so far, stories about Obama or his administration have lacked the requisite distance to be anywhere close to decent as movies.feedback

Mar 21 2017

Being Mexican American is tough. … We’ve gotta be twice as perfect as anybody else, ” Abraham Quintanilla Jr. (Edward James Olmos) grumbles to his daughter Selena (Jennifer Lopez) halfway through “Selena, ” the 1997 biopic of the iconic Tejano singer. “I mean, we gotta know about John Wayne and Pedro Infante. We gotta know about Frank Sinatra and Agustín Lara. We gotta know about Oprah and Cristina. … Japanese Americans, Italian Americans, German Americans. Their homeland is on the other side of the ocean. Ours is right here … We gotta be more Mexican than the Mexicans and more American than the Americans, both at the same time. It’s exhausting!”.feedback

Mar 21 2017

If you enjoy experiencing emotions ranging from irritation to outright terror, both the early months of Donald Trump’s presidency and the responses to his administration provide plenty of fodder for your ire. And though it might rank relatively low on my laundry list, one pet peeve has emerged from our constantly swirling news cycle: the idea that Trump has single-handedly made Washington uncool or uncultured, or that the city is a less-interesting place to travel to simply because Trump is in residence here.feedback

Mar 17 2017

The utter creative bankruptcy represented by the news that Warner Brothers is developing a reboot of “The Matrix, ” the wildly original 1999 blockbuster film about the last stand in a war between humanity and the machines that have surpassed them, is too obvious - and honestly, too depressing - to dwell on for long. It was deadening enough to watch Hollywood repeat the same story beats over and over again in genres like superhero movies that were designed to repeat and reset: Seeing the industry prepare to cannibalize its own most creative blockbusters makes me wonder whether mass culture wouldn’t be better off if the San Andreas Fault just opened up and swallowed the 30-mile zone.feedback

Mar 16 2017

Last month, at the Conservative Political Action Conference, President Trump’s chief strategist, Stephen Bannon, laid out what he believed to be the unifying idea behind Trump’s victory.feedback

Mar 16 2017

It’s not exactly news that President Trump would prefer a more circumscribed news media, which he has described as “the enemy of the American people.” And despite his previous success as an entertainer, he apparently doesn’t think much of artists’ freedom of expression, either. Early on March 15, as is his wont, Trump tweeted grumpily, “Can you imagine what the outcry would be if @SnoopDogg, failing career and all, had aimed and fired the gun at President Obama? Jail time!”.feedback

Mar 15 2017

This piece discusses the plot of “Get Out” in great detail. Don’t email me and complain that I didn’t put up a spoiler warning.feedback

Mar 14 2017 - Immigration

Lately, I’ve been thinking about the similarities between gender and immigration to the United States. You can try endlessly to delineate the differences between people who were born Americans and those who are now living here as citizens, or you can talk about what the United States gains from welcoming new citizens, even if their arrival requires a mutual adjustment.feedback

Mar 13 2017

This movie discusses the plot of “Kong: Skull Island” in detail.feedback

Mar 06 2017 - Feminism

Bette and Joan, ” the first installment of Ryan Murphy’s new anthology series, premiered last night in a delicious swish of fabulous dresses and glittering jewels. The miniseries, which chronicles the making of “Whatever Happened to Baby Jane?” and the enmity between Bette Davis (an astonishingly good Susan Sarandon) and Joan Crawford (Jessica Lange, excellent ever in Murphy’s capable hands), is a fascinating exploration of feminism and how little progress the ostensibly liberal entertainment industry has made towards equality. As Crawford puts it while searching for a role, “Everything written for women seemed to fall into just three categories: ingenues, mothers, or gorgons.” As I watched the first five episodes of “Feud, ” I found myself thinking as much about how the series fits into Murphy’s larger project of explaining America as about the feud in question.feedback

Mar 02 2017

Pop culture anniversaries tend to be occasions for gauzy nostalgia or vigorous defenses of the places various pieces of art ought to have in the canon. I don’t feel any need to defend David Fincher’s “Zodiac, ” one of the greatest movies yet released this century, which arrived in theaters ten years ago today. And I don’t feel warm and fuzzy about it either. The great thing about “Zodiac, ” which tracks the search for the serial killer of the same name, is the way it adds an eerie, record-scratch of a scream below gloomy moment when the promises of the 1960s seemed to be curdling, and the sense of malaise and decline that would characterize the 1970s was setting in. “Zodiac” is a movie about how uncertainty and institutional failure will drive you mad, and as a result, it’s more relevant than ever.feedback

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