Article 50

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Last quote about Article 50

Paul Pester
We are not seeing any signs of strain. I think we see from our customers that to a degree they are taking Brexit in their stride.feedback
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Oct 26 2017
“An implementation period is about a period which is adjusting to the future relationship. That's the basis on which I put it forward to the European Union, and that's the basis on which we'll be negotiating an agreement on it.” said Theresa May speaking about Article 50. It’s one of the 1038 quotes about Article 50 you can find on this page. 476 people have said something about this topic. Among them: David Davis and Boris Johnson. Browse the quotes by date and by name to find those that are relevant to you.
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All quotes about Article 50

Robert Halfon

Far from the Brexodus, these figures clearly show that EU students are continuing to come to the UK, one of the best countries in the world for higher education. This is incredibly encouraging and a sign that it is not all doom and gloom post-Brexit.feedback

Stephen Jones

This report is timely as it shines a light on the importance of agreeing a post-Brexit settlement that supports the sector, and crucially the foreign banks who have chosen to base themselves here to serve UK and European customers.feedback

Kallum Pickering - Joh. Berenberg, Gossler & Co.

Is the Bank making a mistake by going for a rate hike? No. Even though real GDP growth has slowed a little this year compared to 2016, because of Brexit, firms are not supplying goods and services quickly enough to meet the growing demand.feedback

David Davis

If the experience to date is anything to go by we'll have a pretty good idea of where their end game is. We've got a pretty good idea of what the economic interests are of every single member state.feedback

David Davis

Nevertheless we've got a pretty good idea of where they will end up at the end of this, even if there are delays on the way.feedback

David Davis

Germany, Austria, Holland and Czechoslovakia are all without governments at the moment so this is not top of their tree.feedback

Jo Johnson

I am sure Chris is regretting this very much. The Government is absolutely committed to academic freedom and freedom of speech in our university system. I think a letter that could have been misinterpreted should probably not have been sent in this way.feedback

David Davis

My hunch on this is it will be co-terminus in terms of agreement, not quite in terms of signing, with the forward relationship. It could be, yes, it could be. Well, it can't come before we have the deal.feedback

Jo Johnson

Chris was acting in an individual capacity as an MP rather than as a government minister… Chris has a very longstanding interest in European affairs and the history of European thought. I am sure Chris is regretting this very much. The critical thing is that the government is absolutely committed to academic freedom and to freedom of speech in our universities. A letter which could have been misinterpreted should probably not have been sent.feedback

Angela Rayner

It would be deeply ironic if, even as the universities minister was unveiling his latest unworkable gimmick in the name of free speech, a senior Tory colleague was busy compiling a register of heretics. The last thing universities need is some kind of pound shop McCarthy telling them what they are allowed to teach. Academics and students are perfectly capable of critical thinking and discussion about policy issues like Brexit. If only we could say the same about Tory ministers.feedback

Jacob Rees-Mogg

Mark Carney is one of the enemies of Brexit, he has attacked it consistently. He's been consistently wrong. It's the constant refrain of the BBC - in spite of Brexit there's some good news, because of Brexit there's some bad news.feedback

Michael R. Bloomberg

We are opening a brand new European headquarters in London – two big, expensive buildings. Would I have done it if I knew they were going to drop out? I've had some thoughts that maybe I wouldn't have, but we are there, we are going to be very happy.feedback

Emma Walmsley - GlaxoSmithKline

It is mainly related to the construction of new testing facilities across Europe and potential preparations for licence changes as well. All of that work is underway in the detailed planning group, and we will be ready for it as necessary.feedback

Emma Rees

That Jacob Rees-Mogg has become the emblem of the Tory grassroots should horrify the decent majority of Britain. From opposing equal rights for LGBTQ people to opposing women's right to choose – even when they've been raped – his views belong in the 18th century.feedback

Jacob Rees-Mogg

Mark Carney has consistently complained about the Brexit vote and the result. He said before the Brexit vote there would be a sharp downturn in the economy because of Brexit, he had a panic interest rate cut that was completely unnecessary and helped push the pound down further than it would otherwise have gone. Mark Carney is one of the enemies of Brexit. He has opposed it consistently.feedback

Jacob Rees-Mogg

The BBC always wants to blame things on Brexit. I'm not saying this is a conspiracy, I'm saying it is a fact of life.feedback

Martin Kettle

The secretary of state for EU exit has dismissed the idea of a parliamentary vote until after Brexit happens. It’s a major failure of his political antennae. David Davis has dropped the government into another crisis of credibility by saying that parliament may not be able to vote on the final Brexit deal until after the UK has left the EU in March 2019.feedback

Felipe Munoz

As anticipated, European registrations are starting to slow down following their unprecedented run of strong results. Whilst a drop after such high levels of growth is not unusual, it is clear that the recent performance of the UK car market - one of Europe's most significant - is having a substantial impact on the European car market as a whole.feedback

Janet Beer

We are entering the period in which universities need to be finalising their research, collaboration and student exchange programmes for 2019. There is an urgent need for clarity on the UK's participation in Horizon2020 beyond Brexit. This scheme enhances the impact of our research by providing access to vital networks, talent and funding. Without clarity, the risk is that important European research programmes could stall.feedback

Janet Beer

The arrival on campuses across Europe of students hoping to study abroad in 2019 increases the need to know whether the UK will or will not be able to continue to take part in Erasmus+. Outward mobility schemes such as Erasmus+ have major benefits for students, universities and employers.feedback

David Davis

It's no secret that the way the union makes its decisions tends to me at the 59th minute of the 11th hour of the last day. That's precisely what I would expect to happen here. I am quite sure in my mind that we can do that. If there is a time-limit on a negotiation the union stops the clock, it assumes it is still at 11.59 and it carries on until the deal is concluded, sometimes for 24, 36, 48 hours. That what I imagine will happen here. It will be a lot of pressure, very high stress, very exciting for everybody watching. But that will be what happens.feedback

David Davis

His original plan for the timetable was effectively do the withdrawal agreement up to the end of March 2019 and then start the trade agreement in an infinite transition arrangement, which would have put us in a very difficult negotiating position because we would want to solve quickly and they would want to solve slowly. I would be aiming to get certainly the outlines of it agreed, if we could, in the first quarter [of 2018] ... but it's a negotiation.feedback

David Davis

What we're aiming for is the conclusion of negotiations on all fronts by the end of March 2019. In principle, what she said in the chamber is right ... But what we are intending to do is get the form of the implementation period agreed quickly, December thereafter, but we want to conclude the overall negotiation by the end of March 2019.feedback

Jonathan Freedland

MPs backing Brexit despite their beliefs should take note of Republican senators Jeff Flake and Bob Corker, who have made career sacrifices to avert disaster. Those craving the end of the Trump presidency will hail Jeff Flake and Bob Corker as heroes. They are conservative Republican senators who have turned on their own party’s president, Flake condemning Donald Trump in a powerful, stirring speech in the chamber yesterday, Corker dishing it out in a form his target will understand: an interview followed by a series of sharp, barbed tweets. The latest reads: “Same untruths from an utterly untruthful president. #AlertTheDaycareStaff,” the hashtag being a reference to Corker’s earlier description of the White House as “an adult day care center”.feedback

Jo Johnson

We have absolutely no intention of interfering with that, nor do we have any intention of interfering with the criteria of selection of academic staff, their appointment or reasons for dismissal. These are autonomous and private institutions, largely, and we are deeply respectful of that.feedback

Jo Johnson

There is 24 carat academic freedom in this country. We have entrenched it in statute only as recently as this April and it is really important that we take stock of exactly what this means.feedback

Mark W. Warner

Russian active measures didn't begin, or end, with the American presidential election. America's allies all need to be on guard against Russian propaganda and misinformation.feedback

Anderson França

People died so that this expression could be revered until today. But in Brazil if you key in #blackisbeautiful you are going to find ass paper.feedback

Richard Donnell

Stretched affordability, low yields for investors and concerns over Brexit and its impact on employment are weighing on market sentiment. As a result, further house price falls in real terms across London are inevitable as prices re-align to what buyers are willing to spend. Consequently, nominal house price inflation in London looks set to remain between 1pc to 3pc over the next six to twelve months.feedback

Jean-Claude Juncker - European Commission

The Commission is not negotiating in a hostile mood (on Brexit). We want a fair deal with Britain and we will have a fair deal with Britain.feedback

Liam Fox

If you want to put it in shorthand people say money will go where money can be made, money can be moved, and money can be removed. That is a function of law and that is why London will remain pre-eminent.feedback

Liam Fox

No, London is and has been the premier financial center of the world. It has a depth of financial infrastructure that really stretches across the United Kingdom. It has got a level of liquidity that people struggle to find anywhere else.feedback

Pier Carlo Padoan

I am a bit more skeptical that after Brexit this will be untouched, and I am not saying this because I like the view. This is simply a fact.feedback

Paul Vernon

The stakes could not be higher and there is a fine balance between creating a climate where we can seize the opportunities that Brexit may present and being left with seriously detrimental trading conditions.feedback

Alistair Jarvis

This request suggests an alarming attempt to censor or challenge academic freedom. It is essential that universities remain places where free speech flourishes. This means protecting independence in academic study, encouraging rigorous debate and providing opportunities to hear and challenge a diverse range of views.feedback

Donald Tusk - European Council

We have managed to build and maintain unity among the 27. But ahead of us is still the toughest stress test. If we fail it, the negotiations will end in our defeat. It is in fact up to London how this will end: with a good deal, no deal or no Brexit. But in each of these scenarios we will protect our common interest only by being together.feedback

Damian Collins

Part of this inquiry will focus on the role of foreign actors abusing platforms such as yours to interfere in the political discourse of other nations, . I believe that the information I have requested is in line with that already supplied to Facebook to several United States Senate Committees, including the Senate Intelligence Committee, in relation to the 2016 U.S. presidential election.feedback

Felix Hufeld

For the time being, we therefore have to assume that the UK will not be member of the common market or anything close to it following Brexit. There are only 18 months to go before that happens, possibly leading to a so-called cliff-edge situation.feedback

Felix Hufeld

We all will pay a price. The assumption that this will be a cost-free incident is unrealistic.feedback

Felix Hufeld

Things that can be tolerated at the start, for instance to avoid cliff effects, must be brought into an appropriate balance in the medium term.feedback

Pierre Gramegna

It's key for Europe ... that the Number 1 financial centre in the world remains in Europe.feedback

Theresa May

An implementation period is about a period which is adjusting to the future relationship. That's the basis on which I put it forward to the European Union, and that's the basis on which we'll be negotiating an agreement on it.feedback

Liam Fox

I don't know what that number is but it's very clear that we could only have that final number as part of a final agreement, we would want to know what the end state is. Away from the hyperbole around the divorce bill there is actually a great deal of cooperation going on between us.feedback

John Redwood

You cannot have a transition unless you have in place an agreement about a new relationship which you are then going to move to. As the EU is not yet willing to negotiate a new relationship the idea of transition is premature. No relationship agreement, no transition.feedback

John McDonnell

If the prime minister is not willing to stand up to the reckless Brexiteers in her party, will the chancellor? Will the chancellor make it clear, as business leaders have been calling for, that we need the principles of any transition confirmed by the end of this year?feedback

John McDonnell

The prime minister yesterday sowed more confusion in her statement, giving the impression that a transition is to be negotiated only after we have settled on what the future partnership will be. Businesses cannot wait. They need to plan now. Jobs are in jeopardy now.feedback

Philip Hammond

Last week at the European council, the 27 agreed to start internal preparatory discussions on guidelines in relation to an implementation period. Together with broad support for the idea in parliament, this should give British businesses confidence we are going to provide them with the certainty they require.feedback

Philip Hammond

Whilst we are preparing for all outcomes in our negotiations, the government's objective is to reach a deal. As part of that deal, we want to agree an implementation period during which businesses and governments can prepare for the new relationship and we want to agree the principles of that period as soon as possible.feedback

Nicola Sturgeon

The gulf between EU/business/post-Florence understanding of 'transition' and what PM now seems to be saying surely needs urgent resolution.feedback

Michael R. Bloomberg

My former wife was a Brit, my daughters have British passports, so we love England – it's the father of our country, I suppose. But what they are doing is not good and there is no easy way to get out of it because if they don't pay a penalty, everyone else would drop out. So they can't get as good of a deal as they had before. I did say that I thought it was the single stupidest thing any country has ever done but then we Trumped it.feedback

Mark Zuckerberg - Facebook

It is a new challenge for internet communities to deal with nation-states attempting to subvert elections.feedback

Michael R. Bloomberg

Whatever London and the UK's relationship to the EU proves to be, London's language, timezone, talent, infrastructure and culture all position it to grow as a global capital for years to come. We are very optimistic about London's future and we are really excited to be a part of it. They didn't have an immigration problem and they didn't need control of their borders. They have the English Channel – that gave them control of their borders.feedback

Werner Hoyer - European Investment Bank

As things stand, repayment will come only when the current loan portfolio, in which the British are participants, is fully recovered.feedback

Miles Beale

UK wine businesses have already had to contend with the sharp devaluation in sterling, rising inflation and uncertainty following the Brexit vote – all of which add cost to companies making wine available to the UK's 30 million consumers. The last thing UK wine businesses or British consumers need now is another rise in excise duty.feedback

Terry Richardson

I collaborated with consenting adult women who were fully aware of the nature of the work, and as is typical with any project, everyone signed releases. I have never used an offer of work or a threat of rebuke to coerce someone into something that they did not want to do. I give everyone that I work with enough respect to view them as having ownership of their free will and making their decisions accordingly, and as such, it has been difficult to see myself as a target of revisionist history.feedback

Manuel Oliveri - Crédit Agricole

Sentiment seems to have softened a bit on the back of the EU Summit, but from a broader perspective we still have disagreements.feedback

David Blanchflower

Output per man hour today is essentially unchanged ever since the austerity was imposed by the coalition too effect. As a consequence, the public finances are in much worse shape than the chancellor has claimed, given there is likely much less growth.feedback

Andrew Sentance - PricewaterhouseCoopers

A rate rise – and the promise of more to come – should help sterling and take some of the inflationary pressure off consumers. A gradual policy of edging interest rates up would also head off an unwanted surge in borrowing which is at risk of developing on the back of prolonged low interest rates. The MPC has already left it too long to start the process of gradually raising interest rates and should not put it off any longer.feedback

Andrew Sentance - PricewaterhouseCoopers

The weakness of domestic investment and consumer spending is preventing the UK benefiting from a general upswing in the global economy and an improvement in growth in the rest of the EU.feedback

Caroline Lucas

The Tory government has been hijacked by hardliners. ‘Taking back control’ is meant to be about imagining a better democracy, so let’s start with Westminster. Brexit is a disaster. We’re seeing consistent antagonistic leaks from the negotiating room, economists predicting extreme headwinds and continued delay of the withdrawal bill in parliament. A smooth transition of any sort was always a pipe dream – and we’re now facing the very real prospect of a “no deal” scenario. The prime minister might yesterday have been hailing progress in the talks, but the truth is that the whole process is a giant tragedy playing out as a daily farce – and it is young people who are likely to suffer its worst effects.feedback

Felix Hufeld

Banks that are planning a comprehensive division of work between offices in London and the EU need to transplant and split up their entire ecosystem established over the years – that means IT infrastructures, knowledge, processes and people. What is not allowed is for the subsidiary in the EU not to have an adequate control system on-site, and to therefore be dependent on the sister or parent company in London in order to fulfil the necessary control functions.feedback

Michel Barnier

The strategic interest of our continent is to partner with this very large country with a permanent seat on the United Nations security council. But this is not a reason to undermine the single market.feedback

Michel Barnier

That would mean leaving the single European sky agreement, and no longer being able to mutually recognise pilot qualifications or get take off or landing clearance. And what would happen to the food products imported into the United Kingdom? There would immediately be customs controls, perhaps taxes. That's why I want a deal.feedback

Theresa May

Not only that, it would start from the false premise that there is no pre-existing regulatory relationship between us. And precedent suggests that it could take years to negotiate. We can do so much better than this.feedback

Michel Barnier

The two phases are difficult. The second will be very different and will last several years. It is truly unique because instead of promoting regulatory convergence, it will aim to frame a difference. It will involve risks, including about its political ratification, making all the more necessary transparency around these topics.feedback

Michel Barnier

I will give you some examples. In London, to leave the Euratom treaty without an agreement would mean immediate problems for the import of nuclear material, whether for nuclear power plants or hospitals.feedback

Stephen Kinnock

The government is making an utter shambles of negotiations. My party, united under Jeremy Corbyn and with no Europhobic baggage, is Britain’s only hope. Brexit is often portrayed as just another episode in the long-running and seemingly endless Tory soap opera about Europe – who’s up, who’s down, and who is stabbing whom in the back this week. But the reality is that the outcome of these negotiations will define the future trajectory of our country. From jobs to the value of the pound in your pocket, national security, immigration, food safety and supply, public services funding, employment rights and environmental standards, these talks will shape almost every area of daily life for generations to come.feedback

Nicholas Shaxson

Brexiteers fantasise about a new offshore status outside the EU, but it would bring in dirty money not wealth creation. Britain’s economic strategies have been dogged for many years by an elusive concept called “competitiveness”. Back in January Philip Hammond even tried to use it as threat in the Brexit negotiations. “If Britain were to leave the European Union without an agreement on market access,” he said, “we could be forced to change our economic model... to regain competitiveness.” Labour’s Jeremy Corbyn last week pledged to repudiate the model.feedback

Sadiq Khan

He's articulating publicly what many CEOs and investors who love working in London have been saying privately, which is that unless they have certainty about what happens after March 29, 2019, they have got to make a plan B. He's not bluffing. When I speak to businesses each day, they're not bluffing.feedback

Theresa May

The point of the implementation period is to put in place the practical changes necessary to move to the future partnership. In order to have that you need to know what the future partnership is going to be. If we haven't got a long-term trade deal agreed by this time next year, then there won't be any transition deal at all and Britain will end up on WTO rules by March 2019. I am ambitious and positive about Britain's future and these negotiations.feedback

Pierre Bose

We need results on the Brexit talks because from a corporate perspective, for investment spending, you need better clarity. At this moment you don't have contagion from Spain to the broader European market. It's seen as a national and localised issue.feedback

Liam Fox

If we have no deal and we trade on current WTO terms, that's the basis not only that Britain trades with countries like the United States, but that the EU trades with the rest of the world in most circumstances. So it's not exactly a nightmare scenario.feedback

Sadiq Khan

Of course that's one of the options because you can't have a situation where our parliament is supposed to be sovereign, our parliament rejects the deal made by our government and everyone is in paralysis.feedback

Sadiq Khan

That's why the prime minister and our government need to – as soon as possible – announce what plans we've got for the transition period. That includes how long it's going to be and what it entails. Otherwise, my fear is that other businesses could well be thinking of leaving London and will realise those plans by making these announcements.feedback

Sadiq Khan

If you speak to the CBI, they say we need certainty by the first quarter of next year. The deputy governor of the Bank of England is saying by the end of this year. The prime minister and our government has got to provide businesses with the certainty they need.feedback

Martin Selmayr - European Commission

I deny that 1/we leaked this; 2/Juncker ever said this; 3/we are punitive on Brexit. It's an attempt 2 frame EU side & 2 undermine talks ... This is false. I know it doesn't fit your cliché, @NickJTimothy. But @JunckerEU & I have no interest in weakening PM.feedback

Boris Johnson

I suggest humbly to our friends and partners in Brussels: Now is the time to get on with it. They should grip it, get on with it and start thinking about the future. I'm sure that we can both think very creatively and very positively about how to come to arrangements that suit our constituents on both sides of the Channel and benefit businesses not just in this but in Paris and Frankfurt and across the whole of Europe. We think it's an excellent text, and excellent basis on which to proceed and we hope our European friends and partners agree.feedback

Sadiq Khan

To be fair to the chief executive of Goldman Sachs, he's articulating publicly what many CEOs, investors and people who love working in London have been saying privately, which is, unless they have certainty about what happens after March 2019, they've got to make a Plan B. They can't afford to say to their shareholders and those who work for their business come March 2019: 'We forgot to make plans, we didn't plan for this and so, as a consequence, we're paying the price for falling off the cliff-edge.feedback

Rain Newton-Smith - Confederation of British Industry

Growth in output and orders are still above historical norms, and it's encouraging that plans for spending on innovation and training are holding their own. But we've seen a general softening in manufacturing activity over the past three months, with the outlook for investment becoming more subdued. To boost investment growth, Government should use the Budget to provide a fillip for factories through business rate reforms, including exempting new plant and machinery from rates altogether, and switching to the more recognized CPI inflation measure rather RPI when calculating upratings.feedback

Jane Foley - Rabobank International

Over the weekend we've seen a lot of press indicating that there are divisions in the party. So there is this cloud of uncertainty, not just related to the progress of Brexit talks but also to the divisions within the governing party.feedback

Adam Marshall

At a critical moment for the UK economy, the chancellor must be bold and deliver a big budget that prioritises economic confidence and investment. A budget that prioritises goodies and giveaways rather than future-proofing the economy would be a dereliction of duty by the government as a whole.feedback

Lee Hopley

Political uncertainty is adding to the hurdles of cost and lack of skills in holding back spending on automation technology. The forthcoming budget can at least start to address the latter of these challenges, starting with an ambitious industrial strategy that tackles barriers to investment head on and ensures UK manufacturers are equipped to compete for the future.feedback

Mike Cherry

The UK has slower download speeds than Romania, Bulgaria and Thailand. We welcome the government's commitment to an ambitious industrial strategy. But clearly we're not going to have an economy of highly paid, highly productive workers when a significant proportion of businesses can't even access the internet.feedback

Chuka Umunna

Business groups are understandably alarmed by the Government's lack of progress in the talks. And the full-blown Cabinet disagreements over how a transition period would work make it even less likely that a deal will be reached. No deal would be devastating for business, for people's jobs and wages and for national security. The Prime Minister needs to face up to the reality of the situation, stop pandering to the ideological zealots driving the country towards a cliff-edge, and commit to staying in the Single Market and Customs Union.feedback

Adam Marshall

At a critical moment for the UK economy, the Chancellor must be bold – and deliver a big Budget that prioritises economic confidence and investment. The best possible Brexit deal won't be worth the paper it's written on if conditions for growth aren't right here at home. Action to slash the upfront costs faced by business, to incentivise investment, and to improve mobile coverage and infrastructure would lead to a real boost to productivity, wages and trade.feedback

Boris Johnson

As David Davis has made very clear, we're going through, line by line, to see exactly what it is the European Union say they want. And when we've done that we will conclude that negotiation as part of the broader package.feedback

Liam Fox

I don't think they're difficult in terms of the trade law or the trade negotiations themselves. The difficulty is the politics. In other words, how much does the European Commission and the European elite want to punish Britain for having the audacity to use our legal rights to leave the European Union? That's the thing.feedback

Liam Fox

Why would we publish data in a negotiation, that might actually diminish our negotiating hand?feedback

Lee Hopley

With global demand on the up conditions should be ripe for industry to make new investments in capacity and productivity enhancing technology. But Brexit means the future outlook for investment is not clear cut.feedback

Angela Merkel

I think it is very clear what additional steps need to be taken.feedback

Will Hutton

Thatcherites’ support for Brexit reminds us that it was their policies that led us to our current perilous state. In any league table of national figures who have been consistently wrong on almost every major judgement Nigel Lawson must rank close to number one. As Britain and his party reel from the impact of intolerable intergenerational and geographical inequality, stagnating productivity, a vast personal debt burden, and now the poison of Brexit, Lawson is the man most closely associated with the ideas and policies that have brought us to our current pass.feedback

Nick Cohen

The Tories want to ignore Putin’s Brexit role and Labour is complicit with Putin’s mafia state. You’d never guess it, but Britain is a lucky country. Across the democratic world, Russia pursues its interests by corrupting elections with black propaganda. But in their insouciance, our government and intelligence services show dear old Blighty has no reason to worry. On the rare occasions it bothers to discuss the subject, the British state says “it can’t happen here”, even though “it” is happening everywhere else.feedback

Lucy Powell

It used to be a place taken up by Tory men like Iain Duncan Smith and Jeremy Hunt. So a group of Labour women then tried to occupy it. But now the Tory whips have clearly told their women to get into chamber early and just stand there. It is a desperate attempt by the Tories to show they are in charge of the place when the reality is that they are simply losing control of it.feedback

Andrew Lobbenberg - HSBC

They are going to use it as a bit of a laboratory on the marketing and design side, to make it more attractive to millennials. But they battled hard for significant change in the labour contracts at Air France and it didn't work. But it's a better productivity and cost proposition for Air France.feedback

Jean-Marc Janaillac - Air France-KLM

I have never [known] sympathy from Ryanair towards legacy carriers and towards Air France-KLM in particular. I don't feel any sympathy. It is proof that its model, its social model especially, which for us is totally contrary to the European norms and the social content of our culture, has some limits.feedback

Xavier Bertrand

I am conscious Brexit is difficult but I think it is an opportunity to strengthen those relations.feedback

Martine Aubry

Japanese companies are asking themselves the question, we wanted to come to Europe but now are are looking to make a move to mainland Europe. At the same time London remains in our heart and we don't to give that impression that we would turn out back on the UK, we have very close ties in the UK and want to maintain them.feedback

Anne Applebaum

Anyone dissatisfied with intricate international rules should mind Britain’s coming gamble.feedback

Emmanuel Macron

There are concessions to make from both negotiating teams during phase one, but we aren't going to make concessions based on discourse. The objectives are fixed, they're conducted from the European side by Michel Barnier, and we have to respect that. I believe the problem that Theresa May has is that those who defended Brexit have never explained to the British people what the consequences are.feedback

Donald Tusk - European Council

What was important for me and for Theresa May, yesterday and today, was to rebuild this atmosphere of trust and good will. And I think that we succeed.feedback

Jean-Claude Juncker - European Commission

I want to say that our working assumption is not the no deal scenario. I hate the no deal scenario. And by the way I don't know what that means, nobody was explaining till today what would be the consequences of a total no deal arrangement. I am not in favour of a no deal. I want a fair deal with Britain.feedback

Angela Merkel

The two-year transition phase is an interesting idea, no question. But it is not part of phase one of the negotiations. So it is there in the room and will be discussed at the proper time.feedback

Theresa May

The full and final settlement will come as part of the final agreement that we're getting in relation to the future partnership. I think that's absolutely right... I think that can only be done in that particular context. I have said that nobody need be concerned for the current budget plan, that they will either have to pay in more or receive less as a result of the UK leaving, and we will honour the commitments we have made during our membership.feedback

Angela Merkel

We hope that by December we have moved along enough to allow phase two to begin but that depends on the extent to which Great Britain makes progress so that we can say that it is sufficient on the core themes of phase one. In this the financial settlement is the most prominent theme.feedback

Allie Renison

The livelihoods of too many businesses and employees are at stake. While we know there is a risk of all parties failing to reach a deal, it is important that this does not become an overriding fixation for the UK. The IoD expects the Government to be undertaking all types of contingency planning, but we do not want to see preparations for Plan B undermine the main focus on sorting out Plan A. A new deal will benefit business on both sides of the Channel far better than no deal.feedback

Jonathan Freedland

Theresa May’s government is divided and vulnerable. If the opposition steps up, it could end this madness. Some of you will be old enough to remember when the choice was leave or remain. How quaint it seems now. Because once the country voted in June 2016, we faced a new choice. For the true believers, simply leaving the European Union was not good enough: it had to be a hard, rather than a soft, Brexit. Now even a hard departure is not sufficient for the most devout Brexiteers. Demonstrating the purity of their faith, they yearn for a no-deal Brexit.feedback

Angela Merkel

We've been quite clear that insufficient progress has been made in terms of financial commitments.feedback

Paula Nickolds - John Lewis

It is not a contraction of the market it is more about the vagaries of the weather. It would be dangerous to read too much into the October numbers.feedback

Paula Nickolds - John Lewis

In my years in retail I have never seen such a pace of change or level of transformation and disruption we are experiencing at the moment. What is happening in retail predates Brexit, it's about the changing nature of customer behaviour and changes to fixed costs. It's true to say that its been exacerbated by the uncertainty of Brexit and what that has done to consumer confidence.feedback

Laith Khalaf - Hargreaves Lansdown

Finally there's also Brexit in the mix, and the unknown effect this will have on the UK economy, and government finances. All of this means the chancellor's spreadsheets will tell him he doesn't have a great deal of room for manoeuvre on budget day.feedback

Phil Hogan

What becomes more obvious day-by-day is that the Brexiteers are hooked on brinkmanship - and have been since the beginning. Unfortunately, we are now so close to the cliff edge of a hard Brexit that we can see the drop right in front of our feet. It is painfully clear that the UK government is not going to propose workable solutions for the benefit of the island of Ireland. Indeed, the low priority afforded to Northern Ireland by London is disheartening, to say the least.feedback

Donald Tusk - European Council

This is why we will be very consistent in this problem, but please believe me it's not because of money but because of rules.feedback

Donald Tusk - European Council

I feel cautiously optimistic about the constructive and more realistic tone of the prime minister's speech in Florence and our discussion today. This shows that the philosophy of having cake and eating it is finally coming to an end. At least I hope so. The sides are working hard at it but if you ask me, and if today member states ask me, I would say there is not sufficient progress yet. We have to respect our obligations and I think it's not about money, it's about rules and also it's about a good basis for our future relations.feedback

Donald Tusk - European Council

I don't expect any kind of breakthrough tomorrow. We need not only really promising visions and proposals, I mean the Florence speech of Theresa May, but very concrete proposals in negotiations. I am absolutely sure that it is still possible to achieve this first phase in December, but for this we need more concrete proposals from the British side, to be honest.feedback

Dalia Grybauskaitė

If we talk about rhetorical abilities, maybe, but in negotiations you need concrete negotiation abilities, not only rhetoric.feedback

Joseph Muscat

I think it was quite a constructive speech that she delivered. She made her case in a very eloquent manner but I think it hasn't really changed anything from before that.feedback

Joseph Muscat

I think the wording in today's conclusions will show that there is willingness on the EU side to move forward.feedback

Jean-Claude Juncker - European Commission

We will take the exam and look at the results so far but I don't think there will be a miracle. We have some details but we don't have all the details we need. But work is going on.feedback

Angela Merkel

Both sides have to move. We are going to achieve a good result, there will be a good outcome.feedback

Angela Merkel

From where we are now, it [progress] is not sufficient enough to enter the second phase, but it is encouraging to move on with the work so that we can reach the second phase in December.feedback

Dalia Grybauskaitė

Theresa May needs to persuade herself and her government to be more forthcoming and realistic. Their "clear and urgent imperative must be that the dynamic you create enables us to move forward again.feedback

Keir Starmer

I'm bemused by this argument that if you threaten to jump over a cliff that is a good negotiating tactic. Going over the cliff is what will happen in March 2019 if we have not reached an agreement: we are going over that cliff.feedback

Dalia Grybauskaitė

I took stock, listened to what people in UK were saying and what my friends and partners in Europe were saying and I made a step forwards.feedback

Jeremy Corbyn

I think there is a lot of bemusement. Their message is that they want clarity. They want to know what is going to happen on this, and our message to the British government is exactly that. We should pay what we are legally required to pay. We should honour our commitments and we should work on that basis and that principle. You cannot leave EU nationals living in Britain in the limbo land they are living in, and the letter they sent overnight really doesn't cut it. It is like something out of a civil service comedy, like in The Thick of It. Let's have something grown-up.feedback

Theresa May

We will also be looking at the concrete progress that's been made in our exit negotiations and setting out ambitious plans for the weeks ahead… I particularly, for example, want to see an urgency in reaching an agreement on citizens' rights.feedback

Theresa May

I couldn't be clearer: EU citizens living lawfully in the U.K. today will be able to stay. But this agreement will not only provide certainty about residence, but also healthcare, pensions and other benefits.feedback

Emmanuel Macron

This European Council will be marked by a message of unity, unity around our member states in the face of the crises they may experience, unity around Spain, and a very strong unity in the Brexit debate. We're all united on the interests and ambitions of negotiator Michel Barnier.feedback

Mark Rutte

I think that Theresa May has to come up with more clarity on what she meant with 'honour commitments' in her Florence speech. I phoned her last week to encourage her to do that and so far she hasn't. On citizens' rights and border controls, these are still difficult issues but particularly the question of the exit bill will be the main one.feedback

Richard J. Gnodde - Goldman Sachs Group

The right way to think about this, this is like buying an insurance policy. You hope you're not going to have to use it, but if you do, you're pleased you've got it in place.feedback

David Davis

The issue is that in order to give perpetuity on family rights it would give to three million people in the UK rights that British citizens themselves don't have. I am trying to think of a way of maybe a short-term way of sorting this, a certain window whatever. Whatever that might be, might be a bit shorter than that. We haven't engaged on that negotiation properly, it's next on the agenda. We will talk about that.feedback

Peter Liese

We very much hope that we find a good agreement with the British government and especially in climate and energy policy, for us, it would be the preferred option that the UK continues participation in EU policies.feedback

Kelsey Perlman

Stalling European climate action in the aviation sector because of a weak international deal doesn't do justice to the climate. This is especially alarming since the industry's efforts are nowhere near enough what is needed to stay below 1.5 degrees warming.feedback

Thomas Reynaert - A4e

We welcome that policy makers took the industry's concern into account, that there can be no double burden for European airlines which would put them in a competitive disadvantage.feedback

Xavier Rolet - London Stock Exchange Group

Businesses cannot risk a cliff-edge being so near before they start accelerating the migration of functions away from the UK to ensure they can participate in the global market.feedback

Owen Paterson

It is inevitable, with ineluctable certainty, that we're going to end up with WTO at the end of this anyway. So what we're saying is it would be much better to state that now, give business and all our administrative organisations certainty so they can begin to prepare. We have to face the fact that this summit is not going to discuss any future trade deal. We are ineluctably moving down the road to a WTO arrangement so we had better start preparing for it.feedback

Theresa May

Give me Brexit deal I can defend at home, . The clear and urgent imperative must be that the dynamic you create enables us to move forward together. There is increasingly a sense that we must work together to get to an outcome we can stand behind and defend to our people.feedback

Rajesh Agrawal

Clearly Brexit poses major challenges but London's position as a global financial centre and world-class technology hub is built upon strong foundations which cannot be replicated anywhere else. This highlights the need for a Brexit which enables London to maintain its place at the heart of the single market, as the continent's financial capital.feedback

Jeremy Corbyn

The issue of Brexit is obviously a huge one in Britain. Let me be clear: the British Labour party does not see anyone in Europe as an enemy. We see people across Europe as friends. You are our colleagues, our partners, our comrades and our friends. So I urge all leaders on all sides – the UK and the EU. The UK and the European Union must take steps together. There is no need for insults or divisive posturing. It is our responsibility to build a relationship that will continue to thrive for generations to come, and we in the Labour party are determined to achieve that.feedback

Jeremy Corbyn

We would immediately legislate on EU nationals. We would propose legislation on workers' rights, consumers' rights and environmental rights.feedback

Jeremy Corbyn

We are not going to walk away from Europe ... The point we were putting was that these negotiations need to get back on track. His message to us was that he recognised that we are fully involved in the process in the British parliament. It was the second time I had met Mr Barnier. We went through the issues, explained our position.feedback

Bridget Phillipson

The commission is aware of media reports that allege that there could have been Russian involvement in the E.U. referendum. These cover a wide range of alleged activities that are beyond the commission's remit. Any allegation with evidence that a registered campaigner accepted impermissible donations from Russia would be investigated in line with the commission's enforcement policy.feedback

Polly Toynbee

It’s incredible. In Brussels tonight, this tactless, inept, humiliated prime minister will be the only thing keeping this nation on the plank it is walking. Another Brussels dinner tonight, another impasse. Yet Theresa May will face 27 people more enviably united round the dinner table than any group of 27 people she could assemble from within her own cabinet or party.feedback

Jeremy Corbyn

In the referendum the Labour party campaigned for remain and reform. That call for reform of EU institutions and rules in the interests of the many is echoed by many friends and allies across Europe. We will resist any attempt by British Conservatives to use Brexit to try and create any kind of deregulated tax haven off the shores of Europe. A deal that works for all of us. For Britain and the whole of Europe.feedback

Brandon Lewis

We are in negotiations. We will honour our commitments – we have got a moral duty to do that but [we need] to work through exactly what it is to make sure what we are paying for is right for Great Britain, as much as it is right for the European partners. What we are saying to people is that we do value and we want EU citizens to stay. We are very very close to having an agreement on this area.feedback

Michael Fuchs

There is an offer of €20bn, which is obviously not enough. You can just calculate all the pensions and it's very obvious that the Europeans don't want to pay the pensions for the Brits which are living in Brussels. So we have to find a solution on that topic first and then we go on with other topics.feedback

Owen Paterson

It is inevitable, with ineluctable certainty we are going to end up with WTO rules at the end of this anyway. We are saying it would be much better to state that now, give business and administrative organisations certainty so they can begin to prepare.feedback

Brandon Lewis

One of the very common themes across what the EU is looking at and what we are offering is that EU citizens have the right to continue to stay in the United Kingdom. And of course that British citizens have that reciprocal right when they are living abroad in Europe as well.feedback

Michael Fuchs

I cannot give you the final figure, but there is a figure of between €100bn and maybe €60bn (£53.7bn). Something in between these two numbers should be the right point. This is what the negotiations have to do at moment. I hope David Davis is coming up with decent proposals, €20bn is definitely not enough.feedback

Charles de Marcilly

Under these conditions, the only modus operandi you can have when you arrive in Brussels is the firmness at the beginning of the negotiations. And that's the reason why between the fifth round of negotiations, those last week, and the first, one has a feeling of finally freezing, quite little progress and that's where Theresa May will try to show her diplomatic talent this week with heads of state and government, to show that there is progress, to show that it may be a little successful in tweaking their arms.feedback

Charles de Marcilly

The Europeans finally did not offer much concession because they feel that the British have not really advanced. On the British side we have a real problem, it is a domestic policy problem. So even before being able to negotiate in Brussels with a united front, we see that among the Conservatives we see that among the ministers of the government of Theresa May you have perceptions that are very divergent.feedback

Charles de Marcilly

We know that we are coming out of a week of negotiations last week and that the conclusions and the press conference between the two chief negotiators were very cold. We see that there are real divergences, even perceptions of the progress of the negotiations which are absolutely not the same. So the overall message that is launched is that we are rather on the frost.feedback

Charles de Marcilly

But it is very clear that on the European side as long as it is the united front, it is Theresa May that is in a position of weakness.feedback

Charles de Marcilly

On other subjects, notably on the British cheque, the bill ultimately that the British must assume, there is also no firm commitment on the part of the British. We had leaks in the press that they would agree on 20, 30 or 40 billion whereas the Europeans estimate that it is closer to the 100 billion. So there is a real fundamental problem because on these major issues that had to unlock the second phase, it finally does not progress.feedback

Charles de Marcilly

This is going ahead and not. That was one of the priorities of the Europeans. After the second round of negotiations the British recognised that it was indeed a priority. The Europeans say: it is Britain which is leaving, it is up to you to be inventive and to find a solution. Yet in all the documents of proposals there is no solution that is clearly explicit. We see that we could go back to a few border points, we estimate five to 10. From a practical point of view it is very complicated to implement, so today it is always the question.feedback

Charles de Marcilly

We saw on Monday evening that there was a press release from the European Commission that had been released, which was rather paradoxical because it requires a press release so we think there is information. When one reads the communiqué one notices that there is strictly nothing in it. And that if this communiqué had been presented in January we would have had the same content. And then even in terms of images, we did not have much.feedback

Charles de Marcilly

The European Union and the United Kingdom! It must be remembered that faced with this lack of progress you have Theresa May who calls, with different speeches especially one in Italy, to go a little further. And it was normally a new advance on the part of the British. They think that's progress on their side. They expect the same from the Europeans. Except that Europeans see political logic but see nothing at all from a practical point of view. And that's where there's a divergence. It is that once again the British want to put it entirely on the political side. While the Europeans decided to move from technology to politics.feedback

Olivier Jankovec

As responsible businesses, at this stage we simply cannot rule out a cliff-edged scenario for Brexit and aviation. The potential impact of this on air connectivity, consumers and the wider economy needs to be addressed by Brexit negotiators - on both sides.feedback

Olivier Jankovec

This means that adequate contingencies need to be established promptly in case the UK would exit the EU without any agreement on its future relationship with the bloc.feedback

Paul Iganski

I think they'll continue to rise. As the Brexit negotiations become more entrenched, they're a constant reminder of the position of eastern European migrants, contributing to a climate of hostility. As we draw closer to the deadline, and as negotiations get tougher, the climate is going to get worse. And every time we have a terror attack, there'll be a backlash. Each time, it goes up a notch.feedback

Paul Iganski

Britain is no more or less bigoted than any other country, for example in Europe.feedback

Diane Abbott

The EU has offered a fair deal to all its nationals, including Britons who live in Europe. It is in everyone’s interest that this vital issue be resolved at once. The debate on what are called EU citizens’ rights has become mired in Tory party intransigence and infighting, like much else to do with Brexit. But one of the key reasons for the current dangerous impasse is that the entire debate is framed incorrectly. These are human rights, and as such they affect us all.feedback

David Davis

At the European Union council later this week, I hope the leaders of the 27 will recognise the progress made and provide (EU negotiator) Michel Barnier with a mandate to build on the momentum and spirit of cooperation we now have. Doing so will allow us to ... achieve our best objectives and move towards a deal.feedback

Keir Starmer

This is further proof that the government's Brexit strategy is in paralysis. The negotiations are in deadlock and now a crucial piece of legislation is facing further delay. There is chaos at the heart of government. Theresa May cannot unite her cabinet or her party behind this deeply flawed bill. There are now serious questions about whether the prime minister can deliver Brexit.feedback

Gisela Stuart

It is laughable that the EU-funded OECD has the gall to intervene in our negotiations and call for Brexit to be reversed. Instead of trying to hijack Brexit talks, the OECD should urge its financial backers in the European Commission to negotiate in good faith and stop trying to bully the UK into submission.feedback

Leo Varadkar

It's still not clear what the UK actually wants in terms of a new relationship, because on the one hand it seems that the UK wants to have a close trading relationship with Europe like it has now, but it also seems to want something different, and it is very hard for us as European prime ministers to understand exactly what the UK wants the new relationship to look like.feedback

Keir Starmer

Every passing week without progress on transitional arrangements make things worse, not better. Only fantastists and fanatics talk up no deal.feedback

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