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Last quote about Brexit

Phil Hogan
What becomes more obvious day to day is that the Brexiteers are hooked on brinkmanship and have been since the beginning. The hardliners cannot get it out of their heads the idea that if they bully their way towards the wire, the union's nerve will crack. At a time when all the talent and energy of British politicians should be focussed on delivering a good result in the London-Brussels negotiations the ... reality is the London-London negotiation is still going on.feedback
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NEW Oct 18 2017
Brexit has been commented on by 387 key people in the news. You can find all of them on this page with their statements. People who have been most quoted about Brexit are: Theresa May, Michel Barnier and Boris Johnson. For instance, the most recent quote from Theresa May is: “Get ready for no deal.”.
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All quotes about Brexit

Phil Hogan

Unfortunately, we are now so close to the cliff edge of a hard Brexit that we can see the drop right in front of our feet. We have now missed the October deadline for moving to the next phase of negotiations. Only serious engagement and realism can deliver an agreement to move forward by December. It is painfully clear that the UK government is not going to propose workable solutions for the benefit of the island of Ireland, Indeed, the low priority afforded to Northern Ireland by London is disheartening, to say the least.feedback

Paul Iganski

I think they'll continue to rise. As the Brexit negotiations become more entrenched, they're a constant reminder of the position of eastern European migrants, contributing to a climate of hostility. As we draw closer to the deadline, and as negotiations get tougher, the climate is going to get worse. And every time we have a terror attack, there'll be a backlash. Each time, it goes up a notch.feedback

Paul Iganski

Britain is no more or less bigoted than any other country, for example in Europe.feedback

Xavier Rolet - London Stock Exchange Group

Businesses cannot risk a cliff-edge being so near before they start accelerating the migration of functions away from the UK to ensure they can participate in the global market.feedback

Amber Rudd

There is absolutely no place for hate crime in our society and this Government is taking action to tackle it. I am heartened that that more victims are more confident to come forward and report incidents of hate crime, and that police identification and recording of all crime is improving. But no-one in Britain should have to suffer violent prejudice, and indications that there was a genuine rise in the number of offences immediately following each of this year's terror attacks is undoubtedly concerning.feedback

Diane Abbott

The EU has offered a fair deal to all its nationals, including Britons who live in Europe. It is in everyone’s interest that this vital issue be resolved at once. The debate on what are called EU citizens’ rights has become mired in Tory party intransigence and infighting, like much else to do with Brexit. But one of the key reasons for the current dangerous impasse is that the entire debate is framed incorrectly. These are human rights, and as such they affect us all.feedback

David Davis

At the European Union council later this week, I hope the leaders of the 27 will recognise the progress made and provide (EU negotiator) Michel Barnier with a mandate to build on the momentum and spirit of cooperation we now have. Doing so will allow us to ... achieve our best objectives and move towards a deal.feedback

Keir Starmer

This is further proof that the government's Brexit strategy is in paralysis. The negotiations are in deadlock and now a crucial piece of legislation is facing further delay. There is chaos at the heart of government. Theresa May cannot unite her cabinet or her party behind this deeply flawed bill. There are now serious questions about whether the prime minister can deliver Brexit.feedback

Gisela Stuart

It is laughable that the EU-funded OECD has the gall to intervene in our negotiations and call for Brexit to be reversed. Instead of trying to hijack Brexit talks, the OECD should urge its financial backers in the European Commission to negotiate in good faith and stop trying to bully the UK into submission.feedback

Leo Varadkar

It's still not clear what the UK actually wants in terms of a new relationship, because on the one hand it seems that the UK wants to have a close trading relationship with Europe like it has now, but it also seems to want something different, and it is very hard for us as European prime ministers to understand exactly what the UK wants the new relationship to look like.feedback

Keir Starmer

Every passing week without progress on transitional arrangements make things worse, not better. Only fantastists and fanatics talk up no deal.feedback

Philip Rutnam

I think it would be unwise to rule anything out but it seems to me clear that any use of the military would be a last resort. Our strong preference is to deal with the security that's needed at the border with border force and that is the nature in which our planning is proceeding.feedback

Mark Carney - Bank of England

There's a very limited amount of time between now and the end of March 2019 to transition large, complex institutions and activities. A transition agreement is in everyone's interests.feedback

Stephen Clarke - Resolution Foundation

While trade may not have been the biggest issue in the referendum it is one that will affect the day-to-day living standards of every family in Britain. The government must rightly continue to prioritise a comprehensive new trade agreement with the EU in order to avoid households having to fork out for a 'no deal' outcome through higher prices and squeezed households budgets.feedback

Miles Celic - TheCityUK

This isn't just about business leaving the UK. It is about the very high risk of jobs, capital and inward investment leaving Europe entirely. EU and UK negotiators cannot delay discussing a transitional deal any longer if they want it to hold any real value. Firms are beyond the planning stage now. If they haven't done so already, most will be ready to press go on their contingency plans in the New Year.feedback

Mark Carney - Bank of England

It is absolutely in the interests of the EU27 to have a transition agreement.feedback

Mark Carney - Bank of England

I think they now understand the latter is not necessarily going to be the case. We'll have more to say about that in due course.feedback

Rafael Behr

It’s tempting for remainers to predict doom, but much better to judge the project against all of the leavers’ broken promises. Prophets of doom are not much fun to be around. Nobody wants a “Jeremiah next door”, which is how the Daily Mail recently described Philip Hammond’s relationship to Theresa May. The chancellor was accused of spooking the prime minister with Old Testament fire-and-brimstone economic forecasts. His refusal to spread the Good News about Brexit was cited as grounds for dismissal.feedback

Boris Johnson

If we're going to get on to that kind of question, now is the time for them to do so.feedback

Jens Geier

Looking at the never-ending internal divisions within the Conservative Party, we in Brussels are wondering how much leeway Theresa May has at all, and if she is actually able to deliver, or whether she will be undermined by other members of her cabinet.feedback

Ragnar Weilandt

Having sneered at the project for decades, many members of the anti-Brexit brigade are now draped in EU flags. Is this any better than those who voted out?If Britain’s remainers feel at home in the EU, they have a funny way of showing it. From a continental perspective, the undying love some remainers have been professing for Europe ever since the Brexit referendum is puzzling. Because for decades, politicians and commentators in Britain either ignored, misrepresented or sneered at the European project. Now the UK is on its way out, people are suddenly taking to the streets draped in EU flags.feedback

Samuli Virtanen

Sometimes it's very difficult to see and understand what Britain really wants from these negotiations. It seems that at the moment EU 27 is more unanimous than UK 1.feedback

Richard Snook - PricewaterhouseCoopers

The uncertainty over Brexit may be felt more keenly in London than other areas, due to the importance of international businesses. Figures from the City of London borough bear this out, where prices are down 18.4% compared to a year ago.feedback

Bert Koenders

I hope that in the UK the reality comes in that this is a possibility to come to the next stage in December.feedback

Bert Koenders

We, the 27 together, find it extremely important that substantial progress is made on all three areas.feedback

Bill Clinton

The strong winds will continue but should moderate a little bit compared to what we have seen.feedback

Boris Johnson

It's ready for the great ship to go down the slipway and onto the open sea and for us to start some serious conversations about the future and the deep and special relationship we hope to construct.feedback

Andrew Lloyd Webber

I have been privileged to be a member of the house for 20 years and resign with a heavy heart, but in the knowledge that what is expected from a member today is very different from what it was when I joined the house in 1997. I have a work schedule stretching ahead of me that is the busiest of my career to date. This means it would be impossible for me to regularly vote or properly consider the vitally important issues that the House of Lords will face as a consequence of Brexit.feedback

David Mundell

I'm very pleased that we've moved in a positive direction and are building on the momentum from the bilateral meetings held with the Scottish Government over the summer. It is clear we have common agendas and a basis to take that forward.feedback

Damian Green

These principles will hopefully now pave the way to agreeing a set of frameworks that will deliver vital certainty and continuity for people and businesses across the United Kingdom. I think you will see from principles that we have agreed today that talk of a power grab is now behind us.feedback

Damian Green

On the day when the UK leaves the EU, all parts of the UK need to be ready. It is the government's intention that the EU Withdrawal Bill will ensure a strong UK internal market, while safeguarding and adding to the decision-making powers of the devolved administrations.feedback

Philip Hammond

It is difficult at the moment, currency is one of the biggest things that impacts a business like ours. We want to keep the product at a good price for the consumer because we know that wallets are thinner, but we've had slight price increases in line with inflation.feedback

Gillian Drakeford

We've created jobs, contributed in taxes and to local communities and now have 11,700 co-workers. We are here for the long term.feedback

John McDonnell

I think there are enough sensible people in the House of Commons to say, This cannot happen, we cannot damage our country in this way. The Government will get the message – there will be a deal. I think there's a majority to have a meaningful vote. That's what we've said all the way along. We'll be able to say to Government, Whatever you're negotiating, it'll not be on the basis of no deal because the damage to this economy will be so great.feedback

Chris Grayling

I believe we'll end up with a sensible agreement with the European Union because it's in both of our interests that that should happen. But of course we must plan for all eventualities. People would think it was ridiculous if the government wasn't planning for all eventualities.feedback

Laurence Olins

When I saw that interview, my mouth dropped and I thought this needs to be addressed. I was just horrified. It is just indicative of the uncoordinated way the government is approaching Brexit.feedback

Chuka Umunna

The government behaves at times as if parliament's job is to behave like some lap dog and simply rubber-stamp major changes to our country's constitution and relationship with the EU proposed by the executive. That is simply not going to happen on Brexit. Members from across the house are working across party lines in the national interest to ensure we do not jump off a cliff and withdraw from the EU in a job-destroying way.feedback

Michael Russell

We remain unable to recommend the Scottish Parliament consent to the EU Withdrawal Bill as currently drafted and will not be able to do so until the power grab is removed from the bill. I have and will continue to press for the amendments suggested by ourselves and the Welsh Government to be accepted, removing the power grab and providing a clear solution that respects devolution. As I have made clear, it is crucial that Scotland's interests are properly represented at future negotiations.feedback

Mark Drakeford

We agreed the principles that will underline any frameworks but that doesn't mean that we have stepped back at all from our opposition to the withdrawal bill. The Welsh government will take part positively in the discussions that follow.feedback

Michael Russell

We remain unable to recommend the Scottish parliament consent to the EU withdrawal bill as currently drafted and will not be able to do so until the power-grab is removed from the bill.feedback

Michael Russell

I hope that as discussion between the UK government and the EU continue over the coming days we will see a way forward emerge. As I have made clear, it is crucial that Scotland's interests are properly represented at future negotiations.feedback

Michael Russell

I have and will continue to press for the amendments suggested by ourselves and the Welsh government to be accepted, removing the power-grab and providing a clear solution that respects devolution.feedback

Laurence Olins

When I saw that interview, my mouth dropped and I thought this needs to be addressed. I was just horrified. It is just indicative of the un-coordinated way the government is approaching Brexit. Our farmers are unable to find labour this year, never mind post-Brexit. This is the environment secretary. Mention immigration to them and they go absolutely rigid and say the only people who can speak on this issue is the home secretary, Amber Rudd, or Theresa May.feedback

Alastair Campbell

The hard-liners in her party will howl with rage, but most of the country will welcome it if the prime minister is honest about Brexit’s awful consequences. As she tries to move the Brexit negotiations forward, how much better would Theresa May and the country feel if the speech she made to her party went as follows.feedback

Sam Woods - Bank of England

If we get to Christmas and the negotiations have not reached any agreement on this topic, diminishing marginal returns will kick in. Firms would start discounting the likelihood of a transition in the central case of their planning.feedback

Boris Johnson

Let's give them that reassurance, let's give a tiger in the tank, lets get these conversations going and stop letting the grass grow under our feet. So we hope our partners will take that message and begin some serious negotiations.feedback

Boris Johnson

I think that will work very much in the interests of both sides. People say to me: 'Look we want to reassure the 3.2 million EU nationals in the UK and one-and-a-bit million UK nationals in the EU' and so do we. We have made a very good offer. We have made a very fair ... We think it is a reasonable point of view that we are outlining.feedback

Anand Menon

Just when we need it most, the centre ground has disappeared, its inhabitants cowed by party hardliners. The lunatics have taken over the asylum. The Labour and Conservative conferences were proof positive that the moderates no longer hold sway. The cheers were for the zealots, whether that was John McDonnell or Jacob Rees-Mogg. And, whether from front or back benches, it is they who rule the roost when it comes to leaving the EU. So where have the centrists (and I acknowledge, as Helen Lewis has underlined, that the term is imprecise and potentially misleading, but I can think of no better one) gone? And how should they react?feedback

Zoe Williams

The strongmen who fix on the immigrant as the enemy also turn women into objects. “Looking at the Brexit vote now, it was a precursor to some extent of what happened to us in the United States,” Hillary Clinton told the BBC’s Andrew Marr. When President Barack Obama came over just before the referendum to plead with our better natures and warn of an outcome which he elegantly understated the catastrophe of, it felt a little shaming, like a grownup arriving in the middle of a food fight. Clinton, partly because she isn’t president, mainly because those Brexit and Trump ships have sailed, appears less like an authority and more like a coroner at an inquest.feedback

Michael Russell

I hope progress can be made on a number of fronts, for example on recognising the importance of single market membership and amending the EU Withdrawal Bill so the Scottish Parliament can give it consent. The UK Government must reconsider its hard Brexit position and the disastrous impact it would have on jobs and living standards and take account of the concerns, shared by Scottish businesses, about the impact of leaving the single market and customs union.feedback

Carolyn Fairbairn - Confederation of British Industry

Brexit planning must not be allowed to crowd out vital action at home. With this Budget, the Government needs to set its eyes on the horizon, not the next few yards. The only sure way to raise living standards and provide sustainable public services is to solve the UK's productivity problem. This means tackling the weak foundations of our economy with consistency and determination. Faltering consumer and business confidence risks lowering living standards, so it's important the Government sends firms the right signals they need to continue investing and growing.feedback

Chris Grayling

What it would do is that it would mean that producer-supermarket, bought more at home, that British farmers produced more, they bought more from around the world and it would damage French producers and continental producers. You may remember the fuss about the Walloon farmers when they objected to a Canadian trade deal. Their biggest customer was us, they will be damaged if we don't have a deal. What we will do is grow more here and buy more from round the world. But that will mean bad news for continental farmer, that is why it won't happen because it is in their interests to reach a deal.feedback

Chris Grayling

It would mean producers/supermarkets bought more at home, that British farmers produced more, they grow more here, that they bought more from around the world - and it would damage French producers and European producers.feedback

Keir Starmer

No deal means the return of a hard border in Northern Ireland. No deal means no agreement on how we trade with Europe. No deal means EU nationals working in our schools and hospitals and the 1.2 million UK citizens living in the EU will continue to be unsure about their future. No deal means no deal on aviation, which quite literally means planes cannot take off and land. This is not scaremongering, it's the grim reality.feedback

Jim Sillars

We lost 21 seats at Westminster because the day after the (EU) referendum she went shelter skelter for a second referendum which everyone knew we would lose and most people didn't want. I am for a second independence referendum, but you cannot have one sensibly until you know exactly what the Brexit deal is in detail, and then take time to assess it and then take time to formulate an argument for independence.feedback

Chris Grayling

What this bill does is ensures a smooth transition for our laws so that people can be sure that the law that applies the day before is the law that applies the day after. John McDonnell threatening to derail this bill is John McDonnell threatening to create the kind of chaotic Brexit that he himself is warning against.feedback

Leo Varadkar

What we're not going to do is design a border for the Brexiteers because they're the ones who want a border. It's up to them to say what it is, to say how it would work.feedback

Chris Grayling

You may remember the brouhaha over the Walloon farmers when they were objecting to the Canadian trade deal.feedback

Chris Grayling

I remain absolutely of the view that Britain will succeed come what may. But I also believe we'll end up with a sensible agreement with the European Union because it's in both of our interests that that should happen.feedback

Chris Grayling

I had a look at the time to see who their biggest customer was. Us. We are the biggest customers of the Walloon farmers. They will be damaged if we don't have a deal.feedback

Jean-Claude Juncker - European Commission

If you are sitting in a bar and ordering 28 beers and then suddenly one of your colleagues is leaving and is not paying, that is not feasible. They have to pay. They have to pay, they have to pay, not in an impossible way. I'm not in a revenge mood. I'm not hating the British. The Europeans have to be grateful for so many things Britain has brought to Europe before war, during war, after war. But not they have to pay.feedback

John McDonnell

I will not countenance no deal. I am not willing to countenance that. I don't think it is a realistic option. It's not going to happen.feedback

Hillary Clinton

I personally continue to believe in the value of the European Union, and more broadly of a Europe that is whole, free, and at peace. No small accomplishment. And Britain has always been a lynchpin of that vision. What's missing in both of our countries (US and UK) at the moment it seems to me, and what we need more than anything else, is empathy.feedback

Gillian Drakeford

With car ownership declining, we realise we need to be accessible to public transport and closer to more dense populations, and offer more home delivery. We've seen success with smaller collection points, and we will see more of them.feedback

Gillian Drakeford

I'd like to see some clarity. Theresa May talked about a transition period and this would be beneficial for us to adapt to a new trading reality, to allow us to offer products at the best prices. It is difficult at the moment. Currency is one of the biggest things that impacts a business like ours. We want to keep the product at a good price for the consumer, because we know that wallets are thinner, but we've had slight price increases in line with inflation.feedback

Rain Newton-Smith - Confederation of British Industry

When you talk to businesses, what they want most is certainty on EU negotiations and having a transitional deal.feedback

Tim Farron

The government's inability to make progress on negotiations is leaving farmers in the lurch and creating huge uncertainty. Since farmers' exports will collapse if they are lumbered with massive WTO tariffs in the event of a no-deal Brexit, farmers could certainly end up with lots of spare produce they won't be able to sell.feedback

Matthew d'Ancona

It’s the role of all chancellors to urge caution. But his Tory enemies merely want a cheerleader for the hardest of EU exits. The book The Power of Positive Thinking introduced the notion that you can shape reality by mere “affirmations”. It has many adherents, as does the more recent nonsense of The Secret, which ascribes similar potency to “visualisation”.feedback

Karen Bradley

Clearly this is part of a negotiation, but we are looking carefully at the areas in which it is important that we continue membership.feedback

Michel Barnier

This week, however, the UK repeated that it was still not ready to spell out these commitments – therefore there have been no negotiations on this subject. On this basis, I'm not able, in the current circumstances, to propose next week to the European Council that we should start discussions on a future relationship.feedback

Stephen Doughty

There is now growing cross-party anger at the absurd suggestion that we could crash out of the EU without a deal, and without even the transitional period that was promised by the PM – let alone that the government is attempting at the same time to give itself sweeping new powers and undermine the devolution settlement. It is clear the prime minister and Brexit secretary now have a real crisis on their hands over this bill and face defeat on a series of issues.feedback

Chris Grayling

Parliament has already voted for leaving the European Union overwhelmingly.feedback

John McDonnell

I'm not willing to countenance that. I don't think there is a majority in parliament for no deal. I think there are enough sensible people in the House of Commons to say, This cannot happen, we cannot damage our country in this way. There are discussions going right the way across the House. I worry for our country as a result of what is happening within the Conservative party. This is not about negotiating with Europe, it's about fighting amongst themselves and if they can't negotiate they should get out of the way and let us do it.feedback

Philip Hammond

I think that is a bizarre observation. I am very optimistic about the future of the UK economy. It is fundamentally strong.feedback

Andrew Rawnsley

Cabinet ministers who still hope for the best are now tight in the larynx when they try to sound optimistic. The British are great most of all in their pragmatism – or so much of the world once thought. The European Union’s supreme talent is for compromise – or so it was widely assumed. Both sides have much to lose from a ruinous version of Brexit and for that reason it will be avoided. This logic was the basis for believing that it could be managed in a way that contained the damage to trade, jobs and investment from extracting one of its largest members from the world’s most prosperous bloc.feedback

Michael O'Leary - Ryanair

If Britain gets pushed out of the EU, it is absolutely the legal position that flights must stop. You've got to negotiate that bilaterally. If we don't know the legal basis for which they're being operated, we'll be forced to cancel those flights by December 2018, so we can put those flights on sale in Europe.feedback

Philip Hammond

But, bluntly, we also have to consider the possibility of a bad-tempered breakdown in negotiations where we have non-cooperation, and, worst-case scenario, even a situation where people are not necessarily acting in their own economic self-interest. So we need to prepare for a wide range of scenarios.feedback

David Davis

So be under no doubt, , we can do deals with our trading partners, and we can do them quickly... I would expect that the negotiation phase of most of them to be concluded within between 12 and 24 months. Trade deals with the US and China alone will give us a trade area almost twice the size of the EU, and of course we will also be seeking deals with Hong Kong, Canada, Australia, India, Japan, the UAE, Indonesia - and many others.feedback

Philip Hammond

If it is [that we move to] a World Trade Organisation regime with no deal, there are then two further potential levels that you have to consider. One is no deal – WTO – but a friendly agreement that we are not going to reach a deal, but we will work together to cooperate to make things run as smoothly as possible.feedback

Chris Leslie

In the remaining time before committee stage starts, conversations between MPs across the parties will help identify common ground – and enshrining the transition period into law is increasingly likely if we work together in this way. This bill could be the last chance for parliament to put safeguards in place; it's too important to miss these opportunities.feedback

Mark Carney - Bank of England

We've been willing to tolerate inflation being over target. We're in relatively rare company with having inflation over target. More people in the UK are working than ever before, so we're running out of that spare capacity, and that tolerance for having inflation over target in years two and three (of the Brexit process approved in June 2016) has diminished. It's going to be a big adjustment. The scale of the adjustment will depend on what the final arrangement is between the UK and the European Union.feedback

Jean-Claude Juncker - European Commission

The first to be impressed by the enormous disadvantages that Brexit...is entailing are the British. They are discovering, as we are, day after day new problems. That is the reason why this process will take longer than initially thought. We had the idea that we would clear all the questions related to the divorce. It is not possible. We can't find for the time being a real compromise as far as the remaining financial commitments of the UK are concerned.feedback

Michael Barnier

If you are sitting in a bar, and if you are ordering 28 beers, and then suddenly some of your colleagues is (are) leaving, and he's (they're) not paying, that's not feasible, they have to pay. They have to pay. Not in an impossible way, I'm not in a revenge mood. I'm not hating the British.feedback

Michael Barnier

The Europeans have to be grateful for so many things Britain has brought to Europe, during war, after war, before war, everywhere and every time. But now, they have to pay.feedback

Jean-Claude Juncker - European Commission

You know, it's always dangerous to make jokes about that. I gave a speech in Florence in May and I was saying as English is slowly disappearing from Europe I will express myself in French. The French were happy, the British – I had a shitstorm coming from the other side of the Channel. More reason to reply in French. I think that the European Union's linguistic regime gives the different languages equality.feedback

Philip Hammond

Nigel Lawson is entitled to his opinion on this and many other subjects and that's his privilege. We are planning for the full range of options right down to a potentially non co-operative exit. This is not a binary issue of deal or no deal. There could be a wide range of outcomes falling short of a comprehensive trade and security deal but leaving scope for future co-operation with the EU. We have already spent half a billion on Brexit preparations and will spend more as and when necessary.feedback

Jacob Rees-Mogg

It is a great institution going through a time of weakness and it's up to the chancellor as head of the organisation to inspire it. Being an inspiration is always a challenge. I'm sure he can rise to it – he needs to want to rise to it. The budget will be very interesting time to show what mettle he has.feedback

Brian Sheehy

When they announce they're going to do anything on the remuneration front it tends to be the case that most of the big New York firms follow suit, and that is reflected in changes in the UK.feedback

Christine Lagarde - International Monetary Fund

Brexit is an ongoing process and our hope is that it be conducted promptly to reduce the level of uncertainty and the anxiety of people about the outcome and the situation of people first, of business second. Because this is affecting the people and the businesses.feedback

Michel Barnier

To make a success of the negotiations we have got to do things in the right order. That is a condition of success. If we mix everything up, there are risks. As regards the financial settlement, there is no question of making concessions on thousands of investment projects throughout Europe.feedback

Philip Hammond

My message is this: I understand that passions are high and I understand that people have very strong views about this but we're all going to the same place, we all have the same agenda. The enemy, the opponents are out there, they're on the other side of the negotiating table. Those are the people we have to negotiate with, negotiate hard to get the very best deal for Britain. In an interview today I was making the point that we are united at home. I regret I used a poor choice of words. We will work with our friends and partners in the EU on a mutually beneficial Brexit deal.feedback

Iain Duncan Smith

Well, first of all, Mr Juncker knows a little bit more about the bar than many of us do.feedback

Jean-Claude Juncker - European Commission

We cannot find, for the time being, a real compromise as far as the remaining financial commitments of the UK are concerned. As we cannot do this, we will not be able to say during the European council in October that now we can move to the second phase of the negotiations, which means the shaping of the British-European future. Things have to [be] done. One has to deliver.feedback

Philip Hammond

The Treasury and other departments are planning for a full range of outcomes, from a free trade and collaboration agreement right the way through to a breakdown. I am working for a Brexit that works for Britain. That is my full focus.feedback

Jolyon Maugham

It seems to me the Government's reluctance to release these studies is born not of its ability to damage our negotiating position but what's politically expedient.feedback

Simon Jenkins

There is no public or business demand for a cliff-edge Brexit. The prime minister has to work with other parties to sideline the Tories’ extremist minority. So high are the Brexit stakes that divorce talks were always likely to go to the line. After yesterday’s “deadlock”, this appears to be the case. There must surely be an urgent heads-of-government session, at least involving Britain, France and Germany, to cut a deal on cash and talks on trade. It is time to bring on the grown-ups.feedback

Dora Kostakopoulou

They value European citizenship and therefore they do not wish to lose this status as a result of Brexit. So gaining citizenship of (another) member state would guarantee their existing status and their existing rights.feedback

Jolyon Maugham

The European referendum was all about taking back control but how can our democratic representatives make decisions in our interests when the government is withholding vital information? It has been clear for some time that the attempt to keep the Brexit impact studies secret is more to cover the government's blushes than to enable efficient lawmaking.feedback

Adam Marshall

The uninspiring results we see in our third quarter findings reflect the fact that political uncertainty, currency fluctuations and the vagaries of the Brexit process are continuing to weigh on business growth prospects. The Chancellor's Autumn Budget is a critical opportunity to demonstrate that the government stands ready to incentivise investment and support growth here at home.feedback

Suren Thiru

While still high by historic standards, the easing in a number of indicators of pricing pressures since the start of the year suggests that inflation will peak sooner rather than later, possibly by the end of the year. Against this backdrop, it seems extraordinary that the Bank of England is considering raising interest rates. With UK economic conditions softening and continued uncertainty over Brexit, it is vital that the MPC [Monetary Policy Committee] provides monetary stability.feedback

Peter Boockvar - The Lindsey Group

This maybe eases the tensions in the negotiations and gives people more time to adjust. At the same time, some people just want this thing to be over with, and this does not help that.feedback

Theresa May

I don't answer hypothetical questions. I voted Remain. I voted Remain for good reasons at the time, but circumstances move on. And I think the important thing now is that we should all be focused on delivering Brexit and delivering the best deal. But you're asking me to say how would I vote now against a different background. A different international background, a different financial background, potentially. Iain, I could sit here and I could say I'd still vote Remain or I'd vote Leave just to give you an answer to that question.feedback

Lukas Daalder

UK stocks is a difficult area, in the sense that we have negotiations taking place and they're not running as smoothly as expected. I'm not too keen to be fully invested there.feedback

John Bercow

The talking-out of bills, though done both within our rules and often with destructive skill, has not enhanced the reputation of the house.feedback

John Bercow

I can see many difficulties, for example, with a procedure that allowed, for instance, 100 or 200 MPs to seek the Speaker's agreement to a recall as this could be exploited for partisan purposes rather than responding to a genuine urgent situation. Indeed, this could put the Speaker of the day in an extremely awkward position.feedback

John Bercow

This would ensure both a degree of balance and a testing threshold for a recall bid to cross. The house at the end of the day belongs to all of its members and not the minority of it who occupy ministerial office. I think the case for at least a debate in this space is overdue and I hope that it will happen shortly.feedback

John Bercow

Somebody once said politicians complaining about the media are like sailors complaining about the sea – it's about as productive. The media are there and a very important part of a free society. I would much rather a rude and irreverent and sometimes even rather ill-informed media than a state-controlled media. I do sometimes think their own assessment of the importance of what they communicate is perhaps not quite shared by everybody else.feedback

John Bercow

The idea that we are justified in taking weeks off, just after we've come back from the summer recess, so we can go through this palava strikes me as extraordinary. I don't think it's a disclosure of state secrets to say that I've got better relations with May than I had with Cameron. I always got on well with David when we were tennis partners together in the House of Commons tennis team – but things seem to have regressed somewhat after that.feedback

John Bercow

I have long believed there is a certain incongruity about members disappearing for three weeks a year from their primary workplace.feedback

Michel Barnier

These are complex and difficult negotiations. We have shared obligations, we also have shared duties. There is a new momentum and I remain convinced today that with the political will decisive progress is within our grasp within the next two months.feedback

John Bercow

My sense is there will be a lot of people in parliament who will want to be able to vote on the deal. There will be some members of parliament who say: 'I want to be able at the end of all this if I'm not satisfied, to say No, to try to persuade other members of parliament to say No, and to hope that No might delay Brexit or prevent Brexit'. Do they have a right to argue that point of view? They absolutely do.feedback

Arlene Foster

But of course she very clearly understands that that would be a disaster for Northern Ireland and would be a red line for us in the Democratic Unionist Party.feedback

Arlene Foster

The Prime Minister understands the needs of Northern Ireland and we of course welcome the fact that she has been very clear in relation to the fact that there cannot be a border down the Irish Sea. There has been some currency given to that recently, particularly from the European Union side. What has driven us in relation to our confidence and supply agreement is to give stability to the United Kingdom as a nation.feedback

Theresa May

Brexit means Brexit and we're going to make a success of it. I don't answer hypothetical questions. I voted Remain for good reasons at the time but circumstances move on.feedback

Ivan Jimenez

Brexit is a moment at which many are thinking of returning, so we want to encourage them to return home. It is not just financial services and automotive, it is engineering and also academia, where there are real concerns amongst Basque academics living in the U.K. that the U.K. will lose research funding after leaving the EU and therefore their jobs are at risk.feedback

Liam Fox

The chancellor says that we need to spend money only as necessary. I think that's correct. But we also need to ensure that we spend money on all areas where contingency plans are necessary.feedback

Nigel Lawson

What he [Hammond] is doing is very close to sabotage. The really important thing now is that we prepare for the no-deal outcome and it is grossly irresponsible if we don't prepare. I fear he is, yes … You have to spend money from time to time, and there is nothing more important than preparing for what has always been the most likely outcome.feedback

Nigel Lawson

I fear that he is unhelpful. He may not intend it, but in practice what he is doing is very close to sabotage.feedback

Laith Khalaf - Hargreaves Lansdown

The UK stock market continues its winning streak despite concerns over economic performance and the unfolding Brexit process. The question is whether the market's strong run means it's fit to burst. Factoring in earnings, from where we're sitting, valuations in the UK stock market look reasonable, neither particularly cheap nor particularly expensive. That means in the short term the stock market can turn in either direction without defying the laws of statistics.feedback

Josh Mahony

The continued ascent of the FTSE has had much to do with the negative effect of the disjointed Brexit negotiations, with daily updates seemingly highlighting just how unsuccessful the initial rounds of talks have been.feedback

Neil Wilson - ETX Capital

The FTSE 250 is also at a high and I think this is a sign of a broader risk-on attitude across global markets that has pushed Germany's Dax and America's Dow to new records.feedback

Viraj Patel

None of this is new news but, seeing today's unjustified sell-off, met with unjustified reversal & potential.feedback

David Sweeney

Public understanding about university success in knowledge exchange is important, but external engagement with universities is often badged under more specific names. We will work with the sector and partners to develop ways of describing that success in accessible ways.feedback

Jo Johnson

We want to remain a player in European science, research and innovation programmes. And we will continue to attract the best talent from across the world, including the EU.feedback

Jo Johnson

We're continuing to provide significant certainty to EU students that they are welcome and valued here, we've made clear they're able to access the higher education funding system.feedback

David Davis

We are aiming for a good deal for everyone. But we are also planning for a no deal.feedback

James McGrory

I hope that at the inaugural meeting of the new Board of Trade, Liam Fox managed to have positive and constructive discussions with Liam Fox, after hearing expert analysis by Dr Liam Fox on the impact of Brexit. Britain's trade policy is just the sound of one hand clapping. It would be funny in another context, but not when the government is justifying its decision to damage our trade by leaving the customs union on a mirage of future trade deals.feedback

Hugo Dixon

The EU needs us more than we need it, we were told. Germany will be desperate for a deal. Our Brexit ‘progress’ is painful to watch. If Theresa May is to break the deadlock in the Brexit talks, she’ll have to double or treble the money she’s already effectively promised the EU.feedback

Michel Barnier

Slowly but surely over the next few weeks I will explore the way forward, if there is the necessary will, I will explore ways to get out of this deadlock we find ourselves in.feedback

David Davis

We are aiming for...a good, mutually beneficial deal overall. It's as simple as that. As for no deal, clearly this negotiation process is aimed at a good deal for sides. If that's not possible a government must be ready for the alternatives.feedback

Michel Barnier

The risk of no deal, it will be a very bad deal. We will face any and all eventualities. My duty is to follow the mandate and as a negotiator I have to find a way forward. Let me be frank. All these subjects are linked for the member states. We are in deadlock at the moment. But with the necessary will and commitments entered into by Theresa May from Florence we can exit this deadlock.feedback

Sally Potter

My key collaborators behind the camera, were a Russian director of photography, an Argentinian designer living in Paris, a French sound-recording team, an Irish lighting team, an Indian co-producer, a Danish editor – the list goes on.feedback

Sally Potter

What you're seeing with Brexit, and in the film, is a kind of civil war that starts small and gets bigger. There are multiple forms of fracture between the characters, but they all revolve around the issue of truth and lies, and fake self-presentation. That was what I noticed in politics when I was writing the script. There seemed to be a way of spinning truth that was relentlessly inauthentic.feedback

Sally Potter

I thought it would be really interesting to make something that used its constraints as a way of going deeper into the characters and their beliefs. To set it in one place, with no location shooting, no special effects, no car chases, none of the expensive stuff of which there is more and more, cinematically.feedback

Sally Potter

Brexit is about defensiveness and divisiveness, in terms of that knife coming down, cutting everybody in two. What we were doing was contrary to that, because we were cooperating to make something that would take everybody and everything forward.feedback

Philip French

I'd love to see what happened, when Harry Potter met Sally Potter.feedback

Sally Potter

Nobody can settle into one habitual way of doing things. Everybody is learning, everybody is kept on their toes. I think, also, that it makes people very hopeful. People feel that this is the way the world should be.feedback

Donald Tusk - European Council

We hear from London that the UK government is preparing for a 'no deal' scenario. I would like to say very clearly that the EU is not working on such a scenario.feedback

Edward Dolman

The French traditionally had the strongest market in the world until the 1950s, and they taxed it out of existence. It went to London. And so I think market observers are watching Brexit quite carefully.feedback

John Bercow

Of course in the light of the referendum, there are actors on the stage who are very strongly supportive of Brexit who will tend to say, The absolute responsibility now of Members of Parliament is simply to vote this through', but that is an opinion rather than a constitutional fact.feedback

Liam Fox

This is the start of our open and constructive engagement with the WTO membership and sets out our intentions regarding EU quotas to forge ahead and establish the UK as an independent WTO member.feedback

Jeremy Corbyn

If if the PM can't lead, she should leave. Everywhere you look it's a government in chaos. On the most important issues, it's a shambles. Brexit negotiations, made no progress, Bombardier and other workers facing redundancy, most workers worse off, young people pushed into record levels of debt... our NHS at breaking point. This government is more interested in fighting among themselves than solving these problems. Isn't it the case that if the PM can't lead, she should leave?feedback

Bernard Jenkin

She's cleared up some of the ambiguity that the Chancellor left, yes, how can I put it more diplomatically than that? Some of the mixed messages coming out of the Cabinet are the source of the greatest uncertainty.feedback

Carolyn Fairbairn - Confederation of British Industry

As Brexit uncertainty continues, London's bright lights must not be allowed to dim, whether by accident, delay, or design. We must not close the door on its open economy.feedback

Karen Bradley

There isn't going to be a second Brexit referendum. We are delivering Brexit. I believe in Brexit. We are leaving the European Union, I am making sure we leave. I'm part of a Government that is leaving, so I guess you would say Leave.feedback

Theresa May

I don't answer hypothetical questions. I voted Remain for good reasons at the time but circumstances move on. There is no second referendum. The people of the United Kingdom voted and we will be leaving the European Union in March 2019.feedback

Philip Hammond

We also have to consider the possibility of a bad-tempered breakdown of the talks where we have non-cooperation.feedback

Liam Fox

Our agreed collaborative approach shows real progress on how UK government intends to take forward our future trading arrangements with the world. To ensure a smooth transition which minimises disruption to our trading relationships with other WTO members, the UK intends to replicate as far as possible its obligations under the current commitments of the EU.feedback

Philip Hammond

We have made the running in this and we really need our European Union partners to engage ... We are not asking them to sign up. We are not asking them to write blank cheques. We are simply asking them to start talking to us.feedback

Philip Hammond

Every pound we spend on contingency planning on a hard customs border is a pound we can't spend on the NHS, social care or education. I don't believe we should be in the business of making potentially nugatory expenditure until the very last moment when we need to do so.feedback

David Lammy

We have to wonder what exactly the Government are hiding in refusing to publish these reports. Parliament and the public have a right to know what analysis the Government has done on the impact of Brexit, particularly if this analysis reveals that a hard Brexit will be a disaster for our economy, jobs, trade and living standards.feedback

Angus Robertson

All of us, whether we were returned and those of us who were not, are committed to delivering Scottish independence as soon as we can because we have to save Scotland from this damaging hard Brexit approach of Theresa May and her dysfunctional government. However understandable it is to have an ambition that we should not change a winning approach, we cannot simply rerun past campaigns and expect the same outcomes. Because ... there are 1,300 and some days until the next Scottish Parliamentary election and there will also be a referendum on Scottish independence.feedback

David Wood

I don't think they can cope. Right across the immigration system I don't think it's ever been greatly well resourced, and it's becoming tighter and tighter and budgets are getting reduced and reduced. I think that has a bit of a worry going forward, because with the pressure on resources they will be quite easy candidates for removal from the UK, quite frankly.feedback

Nicola Sturgeon

People want clarity about Brexit first. We respect that. We may not yet know exactly when the choice will be made. But we can, we must, and we will always make the case for independence. There is a better future to be had for all of us, if we chose to build it, together. I am sick to the back teeth of British nationalists perpetuating the myth that Scotland could not afford to thrive in the world as an independent nation. They "pay for the support that our businesses need to thrive just as they do for our health service and our schools.feedback

Theresa May

We want you to stay. I'm extremely worried about my future. My question is, in case of a no-deal scenario, will the proposal of 'settled status' be withdrawn, and will EU citizens end up losing their rights and be deported? We want you to stay. That's the basic message, we want to make sure you can stay in the UK. What I'm going to say to Nina is that we will look at the arrangements that we would put in place in relation to 'no-deal.' We're doing that at the moment - government across the board is doing work on that.feedback

Theresa May

I could sit here and I could say I'd still vote Remain or I'd vote Leave, just to give you an answer. I'm being open and honest with you. What I did last time round was I looked at everything and came to a judgment and I'd do exactly the same this time round. But we're not having another referendum. That's absolutely crucial. We are going to deliver on the vote of the British people, we are going to deliver Brexit. 29th March 2019, we come out of the European Union.feedback

Tom Johnson - Barclays

Now is the first time that there's been a period of space without an obvious event like the election or the referendum. There was a period of adjustment [post-Brexit].feedback

Michael Thirkettle

With a lack of clarity from the Government on the Brexit deal, many UK companies and investors are biding their time on committing to new projects, which means confidence remains fragile. Cost pressures are impacting too, with rising prices for imported materials because of the weak pound.feedback

Jamie Oliver

I was doing TV years before him, so maybe five years ago it would have bothered me and I may have responded. But he's got four kids and I've got five kids, and I don't want to be slagging off some kids' dad on telly. It's not nice.feedback

Grant Shapps

I can't imagine there's a single colleague who hasn't had that conversation at some point. A list of concerned colleagues from varying perspectives on issues including Europe (both remain and Brexit) and how long Theresa May might serve therefore, unsurprisingly, exists. Views range from those who believe that she should serve until the end of the Brexit process in 2019, right down to those who believe the party and country would be better served by a more immediate leadership election. A position with which, I appreciate, you do not agree.feedback

Gordon Ramsay

It's all very well to spout off now about sugar tax and supermarkets. None of that was spoken about when he was label-slapping with Sainsbury's for 10 years.feedback

Gordon Ramsay

That level of influx of multinational workers in this country has sort of confirmed how lazy as a nation we are - when individuals from across the seas are prepared to come and work twice as hard for less money. If anything, it's a big kick up the a--- for the industry, and it's going to get back to the modern-day apprenticeship. So not only do I welcome that kind of change, but I think it's going to put a lot more emphasis on homegrown talent, which I think we need to do. Sadly, the only time he opens his mouth is when he's got something to promote.feedback

Theresa May

The position is very clear: the British people voted in a referendum to leave the EU.feedback

Theresa May

Well I'm going to get a bit technical here. There are certain rights that pertain to somebody that is an EU citizen here in the UK by virtue of being an EU citizen, things like the benefits that they're able to access in relation to their home country and the UK.feedback

Theresa May

But my overall message is I want EU citizens to stay here in the UK and I want to be able to guarantee those rights to enable those people to stay. We're not going to be throwing EU citizens who are currently here in the UK out of the UK in the future.feedback

Jeremy Corbyn

Just at the moment when Britain needs a strong negotiating team, we have a Cabinet at each other's throats. Half of the Conservative Party want the Foreign Secretary sacked, the other half want the Chancellor sacked.feedback

Kay Swinburne

There is a reason why we have done so much work at the global level, and I really hope that we are not going to throw all of that away to have some protectionism with regards to a Brexit decision.feedback

Danuta Huebner

We have to do everything to avoid potential inconsistency in decision-making. We must not politicize the whole process.feedback

Martin Kettle

She overplayed her hand on Brexit. Now the chest-thumping conference slogans have gone, as the SNP gets down to some old-fashioned deal-making. Just two years ago Nicola Sturgeon seemed invincible. As she took over from Alex Salmond as leader of the SNP following the 2014 independence referendum, thousands of new recruits flocked to the Scottish nationalist cause, turning defeat into victory. In November 2014 she sold out the 12,000-seat Glasgow SSE Hydro, a week after Lady Gaga had done the same.feedback

Luis de Guindos

It's very clear the independence of Catalonia is not going to take place.feedback

Jonathan Bartley

In many ways he is a joke. But then you listen to what he's actually saying. Let's not pretend that Boris Johnson's comments about dead bodies in Libya was an aberration. It wasn't. The British people have been lied to from way before the Brexit vote and the truth is still being kept from them now.feedback

John Bruton

If the UK was wise, it would then ask its EU partners to extend the negotiation time from two years, to say six years. [Two years] increases the likelihood of miscalculation, and of the UK leaving the EU with no deal at all.feedback

Margaritis Schinas - European Commission

So the ball is entirely in the UK court for the rest to happen. And the UK can always refer to the debate in the European plenary in Strasbourg on the subject.feedback

Theresa May

Achieving that partnership will require leadership and flexibility, not just from us but from our friends, the 27 nations of the EU. And as we look forward to the next stage, the ball is in their court. But I am optimistic we will receive a positive response. I think, frankly, the party needs to get a grip and get on with it, and stop being so beastly self-indulgent.feedback

Hillary Clinton

They voted against modern Britain and the EU, believing that somehow this would be good for their small village. It made no sense… The same thing played out in my race, but I didn't think we were so vulnerable. But it turned out we were wrong – in part because the Russians played a much bigger role.feedback

Bernard Jenkin

It seems blind to the facts, preoccupied with preserving 'access' to the EU market seemingly at any cost. People such as James Dyson or Anthony Bamford of JCB are ignored. Only a fraction of the UK economy is dependent on membership of the EU. It is clear that she wants to be a sovereign state after we have left the European Union and she doesn't want a transition, she wants an interim period leading to a very clear free trade agreement which has got to be outlined in the initial exit agreement.feedback

Bernard Jenkin

The Chancellor has led a very important debate about how we smooth the transition as we leave the European Union but I think this has now got to be crystalised and the Prime Minister should use the authority of her office to impose what she wants on the Cabinet.feedback

Bernard Jenkin

We cannot have some long interminable transition that simply puts off all the issues that need to be decided as we leave the European Union. That would make teh uncertainty go on for those years.feedback

Bernard Jenkin

There is no intrinsic reason why Brexit should be difficult or damaging, but the EU itself has so far demonstrated it wants to make it so; and it has co-opted the CBI, parts of the City and, it seems, the Treasury to assist. They are legitimising EU threats of economic disruption. We are fast reaching the point when the prime minister should assert the authority of her office over the negotiations and call time.feedback

Helen Dickinson

The UK's decision to leave the EU has created uncertainty, not only for business, but for the people from the EU they employ. These are real people with families, livelihoods and homes in this country. It is not right that 16 months after the referendum these people still don't have the security they need to continue their lives. And from our data it is clear that unless we have the right structures in place to support retailers attract, recruit and retain workers, consumers will soon start to see and feel an impact as they shop.feedback

Viraj Patel

This could lead to a symbolic relief rally in GBP – as it could lead one to factor in more progressive Brexit talks. On the flip side, we think rumours of Chancellor Hammond leaving may be unhelpful for GBP in the near-term; his vision of a Brexit that prioritises the safeguarding of the UK economy – while remaining fiscally prudent – has been a supportive factor for the currency.feedback

Bernard Jenkin

The Treasury seems unable to hear any voices except those that reinforce their preconceptions. It seems blind to the facts, preoccupied with preserving 'access' to the EU market seemingly at any cost. The PM should impose what she wants on the Cabinet.feedback

Theresa May

We don't want to settle for a model enjoyed by other countries. Instead I am proposing a unique and ambitious partnership that reflects our unprecedented position of starting with the same rules.feedback

Steve Richards

Talk of a reshuffle is toxic. This prime minister’s fate is sealed, and sacking Boris Johnson could hasten the end. Forget about a lost voice and a backdrop to a stage falling apart. Last week’s Conservative conference is ancient history. It is Europe that torments Theresa May and will bring her down, as it was Europe that triggered her rise to the top. With the Conservative party, it is always Europe. During her statement to the Commons on Monday afternoon her demeanour was impressively calm and stable, but the evasive and contorted content pointed to impossible storms ahead.feedback

Chris Grayling

I feel deepest for those who've made bookings and lost holidays ... I know it's a deeply traumatic time. Let me clear: this airline did not fail because of Brexit.feedback

Jacob Rees-Mogg

If the ECJ still has jurisdiction we will not have left the EU. It is perhaps the most important red line in ensuring the leave vote is honoured. I fear so.feedback

Margaritis Schinas - European Commission

We do not provide comment on comments but what I can remind you of is there is a clear sequencing to these talks and there has been so far no solution found on step one, which is the divorce proceedings. So the ball is entirely in the UK court for the rest to happen.feedback

John Bruton

If it got into detail, the disagreement between cabinet members is so deep that the Conservative party would split and the government would fall. The Labour opposition has a similar problem. UK party and public opinion has been polarised and is unready for compromise. The Conservative party is consumed with its leadership struggle and cannot be relied upon to make a deal that will stick.feedback

John Bruton

The present tight timeframe minimises the opportunity for creative thought. Instead, it maximises the influence of blind bureaucratic and political forces. It increases the likelihood of miscalculation, and of the UK leaving the EU with no deal at all.feedback

John Bruton

If it looks at all these complexities thoroughly, my sense is that it [the British government] may then conclude that, despite Boris Johnson's anxiety to leave quickly, the time limits are already far too severe and that more time is needed … Of course this would be difficult. There are really no good options here. It is a question of deciding which option is the least bad one.feedback

John Bruton

Negotiating and ratifying a transition deal could be almost as difficult as negotiating the final permanent deal.feedback

John Bruton

I hope more negotiating time can be agreed. If not, the tempo of the negotiation must be immediately, and dramatically, increased. Unfortunately, there is little sign that the current UK government, the originator of Brexit, sees this at all. Their mind is on other things.feedback

Nadine Dorries

If I were Prime Minister the person I would be demoting or sacking would be Philip Hammond. I think she very much wanted to do that before the election was called. I don't think he has been totally on board, I think he has been deliberately trying to make the Brexit negotiations difficult, stall them, obfuscate the issues. I just don't think he has been 100% on board.feedback

Dominic Raab - The Telegraph

This new flagship court will build on UK legal services' unique comparative advantage, by leading the drive to tackle fraud and crack down on cyber-crime. By reinforcing the City's world-leading reputation as the number one place to do business and resolve disputes, it's a terrific advert for post-Brexit Britain.feedback

Boris Johnson

Above all, the people of this country want us to get on and deliver Brexit – and we need Theresa to do it. I have worked with her for years and I can tell you that once her mind is made up there is no-one more implacable and determined in pursuing what she believes is right for Britain. Are we really going to be stampeded myopically over the edge of the gorge, with an election that no-one wants? Quo quo scelesti ruitis? as Horace put it at the beginning of a fresh bout of Rome's ghastly civil wars, and which roughly translates as: What do you think you are doing you nutters.feedback

Marton Gyongyosi

I think the whole Brexit issue was such a shock to Brussels that they started to think how to listen more to the citizens and individual member states. Before Brexit, they would say, this is on the agenda and if you don't follow us I will assign sanctions to you.feedback

Viraj Patel

If Boris Johnson were to leave or be demoted as the weekend press is suggesting, that would be showing May's leadership and that her vision of Brexit is the one that (the government) will be going forward with and that markets should be aligned to.feedback

Susan Acland-Hood

The court will be fully equipped with 21st-century technology, and will be a world-leading centre for economic and cybercrime, as well as working across other activity and jurisdictions.feedback

Ian Burnett - United Living Group

I'm delighted by the City's announcement today, which underlines its commitment to delivering justice in the City ... The judiciary looks forward to working with the City and HMCTS to make this a reality.feedback

Bernard Jenkin

The EU wants to make the process difficult, and this key department is helping them. It is blind to the facts and hears negative voices. There is no intrinsic reason why Brexit should be difficult or damaging, but the EU itself has so far demonstrated it wants to make it so; and it has co-opted the CBI, parts of the City and, it seems, the Treasury to assist. They are legitimising EU threats of economic disruption. We are fast reaching the point when the prime minister should assert the authority of her office over the negotiations and call time. A clean break in 2019 would b